A survey of the approach taken when dealing with cases of suspected food poisining or gastrointestinal infection.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/263997
Title:
A survey of the approach taken when dealing with cases of suspected food poisining or gastrointestinal infection.
Authors:
Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI); Public Health Infections Working Group; Environmental Health Officers Working Group
Publisher:
Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI)
Issue Date:
Sep-1998
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/263997
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Foodborne illness is a significant public health problem in Ireland with notifications of food poisoning continuing to rise annually. It is therefore important that cases of foodborne disease are thoroughly investigated so that the sources of infection, the vehicles of transmission and factors contributing to illness are identified. This information is important to ensure appropriate control and preventative measures. A range of public health professionals is charged with responding to sporadic cases of foodborne illness. This survey outlines that public health specialists, environmental health officers, area medical officers and public health nurses are all involved in case ascertainment. General Practitioners, laboratories and the public play a key role in reporting cases. When a case or an outbreak occurs, all public health professionals must work together to efficiently and effectively minimise the number of illnesses and prevent deaths. A lack of communication or a misunderstanding of each other's role in a particular situation may reduce the effectiveness of the Health Boards' response. Identification and investigation of food borne illness often begins at the local community level. However, illnesses extend over county and health board boundaries and many foods or food ingredients are processed or produced in another county or country. As a national body, the Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) shares with the health boards the responsibility for protecting the health of their residents. To meet its responsibility the FSAI is currently coordinating the establishment of communication networks throughout Ireland by developing multidisciplinary teams of public health professionals, particularly through the establishment of zoonoses committees.
Keywords:
FOOD SAFETY; PUBLIC HEALTH

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFood Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorPublic Health Infections Working Groupen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEnvironmental Health Officers Working Groupen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-02T16:01:14Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-02T16:01:14Z-
dc.date.issued1998-09-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/263997-
dc.descriptionFoodborne illness is a significant public health problem in Ireland with notifications of food poisoning continuing to rise annually. It is therefore important that cases of foodborne disease are thoroughly investigated so that the sources of infection, the vehicles of transmission and factors contributing to illness are identified. This information is important to ensure appropriate control and preventative measures. A range of public health professionals is charged with responding to sporadic cases of foodborne illness. This survey outlines that public health specialists, environmental health officers, area medical officers and public health nurses are all involved in case ascertainment. General Practitioners, laboratories and the public play a key role in reporting cases. When a case or an outbreak occurs, all public health professionals must work together to efficiently and effectively minimise the number of illnesses and prevent deaths. A lack of communication or a misunderstanding of each other's role in a particular situation may reduce the effectiveness of the Health Boards' response. Identification and investigation of food borne illness often begins at the local community level. However, illnesses extend over county and health board boundaries and many foods or food ingredients are processed or produced in another county or country. As a national body, the Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI) shares with the health boards the responsibility for protecting the health of their residents. To meet its responsibility the FSAI is currently coordinating the establishment of communication networks throughout Ireland by developing multidisciplinary teams of public health professionals, particularly through the establishment of zoonoses committees.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFood Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI)en_GB
dc.subjectFOOD SAFETYen_GB
dc.subjectPUBLIC HEALTHen_GB
dc.titleA survey of the approach taken when dealing with cases of suspected food poisining or gastrointestinal infection.en_GB
dc.typeReporten
All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.