Early formula feeding practices and their potential contribution to later obesity risk

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/263972
Title:
Early formula feeding practices and their potential contribution to later obesity risk
Authors:
Tarrant, R C; Sheridan-Pereira, M; Younger, K M
Is Part Of:
Conference Proceeding
Affiliation:
Coombe Women and Infants University Hospital, Dublin Institute of Technology
Publisher:
Archives of Disease in Childhood
Journal:
ARCHIVES OF DISEASE IN CHILDHOOD
Issue Date:
2-Jan-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/263972
Additional Links:
http://adc.bmj.com/content/97/Suppl_2/A411.4.abstract?sid=0c3de6f8-5510-458f-96e9-1329d5aefafe
Abstract:
Background and Aims: Early feeding practices, including early introduction to solid foods and overfeeding, are known risk factors for childhood obesity. This study aimed to assess maternal formula feeding practices and infant formula feeding patterns, factors that are known to potentially contribute to later obesity risk. Methods: This prospective observational study involved the recruitment and follow-up of 450 eligible mother-infant pairs to 6 weeks postpartum. Data related to formula milk consumption patterns, formula type/brand changing, additions of solid foods to bottle feeds were examined, and available infant weight measurements at 6 weeks recorded. Results: In total, 368 (81.8%) mothers provided any formula milk to their infants at 6 weeks; of these, 14 (3.8%) reported to adding solid foods to their infant’s bottle feeds. Almost 50% of formula feeding mothers (n = 181) reported to changing their infant’s formula type/brand at least once during the first 6 weeks, mainly due to increased hunger and feeding frequency (2-3 hourly) (54.8%). Where 6 week infant weight measurements were available (n = 184), a mean of 205ml (SD 45ml) of formula milk/kilogram body weight/day was consumed by these infants. Conclusion: Several formula feeding practices with potential implications for later obesity risk were identified in this study including premature introduction to solids (≤ 6 weeks) and consumption of excessive formula milk volumes at 6 weeks relative to infant feeding guidelines. Early provision of recommended feeding guidelines including specific advice on age-appropriate milk volumes to parents who formula feed should be considered in obesity prevention programmes.
Item Type:
Presentation
Keywords:
INFANT FEEDING; FORMULA FEEDING; EARLY OBESITY RISK FACTORS
Local subject classification:
FORMULA FEEDING PRACTICES IN IRELAND
Sponsors:
An independently funded study: Dublin Institute of Technology

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorTarrant, R Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSheridan-Pereira, M-
dc.contributor.authorYounger, K M-
dc.date.accessioned2013-01-02T13:00:51Z-
dc.date.available2013-01-02T13:00:51Z-
dc.date.issued2013-01-02-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/263972-
dc.description.abstractBackground and Aims: Early feeding practices, including early introduction to solid foods and overfeeding, are known risk factors for childhood obesity. This study aimed to assess maternal formula feeding practices and infant formula feeding patterns, factors that are known to potentially contribute to later obesity risk. Methods: This prospective observational study involved the recruitment and follow-up of 450 eligible mother-infant pairs to 6 weeks postpartum. Data related to formula milk consumption patterns, formula type/brand changing, additions of solid foods to bottle feeds were examined, and available infant weight measurements at 6 weeks recorded. Results: In total, 368 (81.8%) mothers provided any formula milk to their infants at 6 weeks; of these, 14 (3.8%) reported to adding solid foods to their infant’s bottle feeds. Almost 50% of formula feeding mothers (n = 181) reported to changing their infant’s formula type/brand at least once during the first 6 weeks, mainly due to increased hunger and feeding frequency (2-3 hourly) (54.8%). Where 6 week infant weight measurements were available (n = 184), a mean of 205ml (SD 45ml) of formula milk/kilogram body weight/day was consumed by these infants. Conclusion: Several formula feeding practices with potential implications for later obesity risk were identified in this study including premature introduction to solids (≤ 6 weeks) and consumption of excessive formula milk volumes at 6 weeks relative to infant feeding guidelines. Early provision of recommended feeding guidelines including specific advice on age-appropriate milk volumes to parents who formula feed should be considered in obesity prevention programmes.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipAn independently funded study: Dublin Institute of Technologyen_GB
dc.publisherArchives of Disease in Childhooden_GB
dc.relation.ispartofConference Proceedingen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://adc.bmj.com/content/97/Suppl_2/A411.4.abstract?sid=0c3de6f8-5510-458f-96e9-1329d5aefafeen_GB
dc.subjectINFANT FEEDINGen_GB
dc.subjectFORMULA FEEDINGen_GB
dc.subjectEARLY OBESITY RISK FACTORSen_GB
dc.subject.otherFORMULA FEEDING PRACTICES IN IRELANDen_GB
dc.titleEarly formula feeding practices and their potential contribution to later obesity risken_GB
dc.typePresentationen
dc.contributor.departmentCoombe Women and Infants University Hospital, Dublin Institute of Technologyen_GB
dc.identifier.journalARCHIVES OF DISEASE IN CHILDHOODen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
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