Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/263834
Title:
Accident and Emergency Steering Group annual report 1997
Authors:
Accident and Emergency Steering Group
Publisher:
Eastern Health Board (EHB)
Issue Date:
1997
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/263834
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
I have,pleasure in introducing the Annual Report of the Accident and Emergency Steering Group for 1997. The report sets out the activity levels in each of the hospitals and also outlines the steady increase in demand over the past number of years. I welcome the inclusion in this report of all nine acute hospitals in the region by the addition of Accident and Emergency activity statistics for Naas General Hospital, St Michael's Hospital and St Columcille's Hospital. The increasing demands experienced by the service have placed great pressure on nurses and doctors who staff the Accident and Emergency Departments and I would like to place on record the thanks and appreciation of the Steering Group for the dedicated commitment which staff have displayed throughout the year, often in extremely difficult circumstances. On behalf of the Steering Group I would-also like-to acknowledge the commitment of the Chief Ambulance Officer and all the Ambulance and Control personnel for-their co-operation in co-ordinating the equitable distribution of the emergency work-load throughout the six hospitals during-the year. The report details the challenges posed to hospital services by the ageing profile of the population of the region. Greater longevity can be seen as a result of healthier lifestyles and better living conditions and also reflects the improved community support now available in helping to maintain older people for as long as possible in their own home environment This does mean however, that when hospitalised, older people are more ill and more heavily dependent, and as a consequence require greater lengths of stay in an acute hospital setting: This in turn means there is an increasing requirement for the service to respond appropriately to the continuing needs of patients following the acute phase of their medical treatment thereby helping to maximise the more efficient use of the acute hospital bed resource. It will be noted from the report that significant numbers of older patients who have completed the acute phase of their medical treatment continue to inappropriately occupy acute hospital beds, despite the additional financial and physical resources which have been put in place in the last number of years. It is acknowledged that inappropriately occupied hospital beds continue to place Significant burdens on acute hospital services in spite of these efforts to ameliorate the situation.
Keywords:
EMERGENCY MEDICAL CARE; HOSPITAL

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAccident and Emergency Steering Groupen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-31T12:48:22Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-31T12:48:22Z-
dc.date.issued1997-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/263834-
dc.descriptionI have,pleasure in introducing the Annual Report of the Accident and Emergency Steering Group for 1997. The report sets out the activity levels in each of the hospitals and also outlines the steady increase in demand over the past number of years. I welcome the inclusion in this report of all nine acute hospitals in the region by the addition of Accident and Emergency activity statistics for Naas General Hospital, St Michael's Hospital and St Columcille's Hospital. The increasing demands experienced by the service have placed great pressure on nurses and doctors who staff the Accident and Emergency Departments and I would like to place on record the thanks and appreciation of the Steering Group for the dedicated commitment which staff have displayed throughout the year, often in extremely difficult circumstances. On behalf of the Steering Group I would-also like-to acknowledge the commitment of the Chief Ambulance Officer and all the Ambulance and Control personnel for-their co-operation in co-ordinating the equitable distribution of the emergency work-load throughout the six hospitals during-the year. The report details the challenges posed to hospital services by the ageing profile of the population of the region. Greater longevity can be seen as a result of healthier lifestyles and better living conditions and also reflects the improved community support now available in helping to maintain older people for as long as possible in their own home environment This does mean however, that when hospitalised, older people are more ill and more heavily dependent, and as a consequence require greater lengths of stay in an acute hospital setting: This in turn means there is an increasing requirement for the service to respond appropriately to the continuing needs of patients following the acute phase of their medical treatment thereby helping to maximise the more efficient use of the acute hospital bed resource. It will be noted from the report that significant numbers of older patients who have completed the acute phase of their medical treatment continue to inappropriately occupy acute hospital beds, despite the additional financial and physical resources which have been put in place in the last number of years. It is acknowledged that inappropriately occupied hospital beds continue to place Significant burdens on acute hospital services in spite of these efforts to ameliorate the situation.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEastern Health Board (EHB)en_GB
dc.subjectEMERGENCY MEDICAL CAREen_GB
dc.subjectHOSPITALen_GB
dc.titleAccident and Emergency Steering Group annual report 1997en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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