A report on the staff survey on smoking carried out in November 2002.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/263812
Title:
A report on the staff survey on smoking carried out in November 2002.
Authors:
Plant, Rose-Marie; South Western Area Health Board. Heath Promotion Department. Tobacco Control Service.
Publisher:
South Western Area Health Board. Health Promotion Department. Tobacco Control Service.
Issue Date:
2002
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/263812
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
As part of its recent development the Tobacco Control Service, of the Health Promotion Department in the South Western Area Health Board, has expanded. Alongside the Senior Health Promotion Officer for Tobacco for the region, we currently have four Health Promotion Officers for Smoking Cessation, one per community care area. A reduction in tobacco use has been identified as the single most important health action that countries can take for both health and economic gain. l Tobacco use is the single, most important, preventable risk to human health.2 Apart from respiratory and cardiovascular disease, it is responsible for approximately 35% of all cancers in our region2 including 90% of all lung cancers.2 ,3 Environmental tobacco smoke has been accepted as a causal factor for coronary heart disease (CHD), as well as for lung cancer and for respiratory diseases in children.4 A cigarette is the only consumer product which, when consumed as desired, kills half of its regular customers. All of these deaths are preventable. The National Health and Lifestyle Survey (Slan) reported in 1999, that 31% of adult respondents were regular or occasional cigarette smokers. The prevalence of smoking was slightly higher among males (32%) than females (31%) but when further categorised by age, the youngest female age group exhibited a significantly higher rate of 40%. The recently published report on the health of staff across the Eastern Regional Health Authority5 identified the following: • 90% of Staff felt that their employer should provide workplace smoking cessation programmes. • Over 50% of staff expressed a desire to quit smoking within the next year. • 63% of staff found environmental tobacco smoke bothersome at work.
Keywords:
SMOKING CESSATION; HEALTH PROMOTION

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPlant, Rose-Marieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSouth Western Area Health Board. Heath Promotion Department. Tobacco Control Service.en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-30T20:51:20Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-30T20:51:20Z-
dc.date.issued2002-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/263812-
dc.descriptionAs part of its recent development the Tobacco Control Service, of the Health Promotion Department in the South Western Area Health Board, has expanded. Alongside the Senior Health Promotion Officer for Tobacco for the region, we currently have four Health Promotion Officers for Smoking Cessation, one per community care area. A reduction in tobacco use has been identified as the single most important health action that countries can take for both health and economic gain. l Tobacco use is the single, most important, preventable risk to human health.2 Apart from respiratory and cardiovascular disease, it is responsible for approximately 35% of all cancers in our region2 including 90% of all lung cancers.2 ,3 Environmental tobacco smoke has been accepted as a causal factor for coronary heart disease (CHD), as well as for lung cancer and for respiratory diseases in children.4 A cigarette is the only consumer product which, when consumed as desired, kills half of its regular customers. All of these deaths are preventable. The National Health and Lifestyle Survey (Slan) reported in 1999, that 31% of adult respondents were regular or occasional cigarette smokers. The prevalence of smoking was slightly higher among males (32%) than females (31%) but when further categorised by age, the youngest female age group exhibited a significantly higher rate of 40%. The recently published report on the health of staff across the Eastern Regional Health Authority5 identified the following: • 90% of Staff felt that their employer should provide workplace smoking cessation programmes. • Over 50% of staff expressed a desire to quit smoking within the next year. • 63% of staff found environmental tobacco smoke bothersome at work.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSouth Western Area Health Board. Health Promotion Department. Tobacco Control Service.en_GB
dc.subjectSMOKING CESSATIONen_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH PROMOTIONen_GB
dc.titleA report on the staff survey on smoking carried out in November 2002.en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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