50 years of heart disease in Ireland: mortality, morbidity and health services implications.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/263792
Title:
50 years of heart disease in Ireland: mortality, morbidity and health services implications.
Authors:
Codd, Mary B.; Irish Heart Foundation Council for Heart Disease in Women; Health Promotion Unit; Irish Heart Foundation
Publisher:
Irish Heart Foundation (IHF)
Issue Date:
2000
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/263792
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
In 1999, 12,996 people died from vascular diseases in Ireland. In 1950, 11,887 people died from the same group of diseases. The populations of the respective years differed, of course (approximately 4 million vs 2.9 million), and a higher proportion of those who died in 1950 were less than 65 years old. However, it is relevant to ask what has happened in relation to vascular diseases in Ireland in the last 50 years, and what predictions can be made about the occurrence of these diseases in the future. Vascular diseases, of which cardiovascular disease is the most common, account for over 40% of all deaths and 37% of deaths under 65 years in Ireland at this time. Within cardiovascular disease, ischaemic heart disease (IHO) is by far the most common. It alone accounts for approximately 25% of all deaths. Three-quarters of those who succumb to ischaemic heart disease die from an acute myocardial infarct (AMI). Thus, cardiovascular disease remains a significant public health problem in our society as we enter the new millennium. Mortality from ischaemic heart disease in Ireland is high compared with rates in other countries. In particular, when compared with other European Union countries, Ireland has the highest rate in men and the third highest rate in women. Progress has been made, however. Analysis of mortality from I HO over the 50-year period under review reveals that rates generally increased to the mid-1970's. A high 'plateau' was then maintained for several years until 1985. Since then rates have been declining steadily. Adjusted rates in 1999 are 37% lower in men and 30% lower in women than they were in 1985. This is almost certainly due to the combination of preventive strategies and improved diagnostic and treatment facilities which have been put in place in the intervening years. If, however, this welcome trend is to be sustained, and the targets set down by the 1994 Health Strategy 'Shaping a Healthier Future' and the Report of the Cardiovascular Health Strategy Group 'Building Healthier Hearts'in 1999 are to be realised, the implementation of proposed additional preventive and treatment strategies needs to proceed without delay.
Keywords:
HEART FAILURE; MORTALITY

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCodd, Mary B.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorIrish Heart Foundation Council for Heart Disease in Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHealth Promotion Uniten_GB
dc.contributor.authorIrish Heart Foundationen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-12-29T21:13:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-12-29T21:13:43Z-
dc.date.issued2000-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/263792-
dc.descriptionIn 1999, 12,996 people died from vascular diseases in Ireland. In 1950, 11,887 people died from the same group of diseases. The populations of the respective years differed, of course (approximately 4 million vs 2.9 million), and a higher proportion of those who died in 1950 were less than 65 years old. However, it is relevant to ask what has happened in relation to vascular diseases in Ireland in the last 50 years, and what predictions can be made about the occurrence of these diseases in the future. Vascular diseases, of which cardiovascular disease is the most common, account for over 40% of all deaths and 37% of deaths under 65 years in Ireland at this time. Within cardiovascular disease, ischaemic heart disease (IHO) is by far the most common. It alone accounts for approximately 25% of all deaths. Three-quarters of those who succumb to ischaemic heart disease die from an acute myocardial infarct (AMI). Thus, cardiovascular disease remains a significant public health problem in our society as we enter the new millennium. Mortality from ischaemic heart disease in Ireland is high compared with rates in other countries. In particular, when compared with other European Union countries, Ireland has the highest rate in men and the third highest rate in women. Progress has been made, however. Analysis of mortality from I HO over the 50-year period under review reveals that rates generally increased to the mid-1970's. A high 'plateau' was then maintained for several years until 1985. Since then rates have been declining steadily. Adjusted rates in 1999 are 37% lower in men and 30% lower in women than they were in 1985. This is almost certainly due to the combination of preventive strategies and improved diagnostic and treatment facilities which have been put in place in the intervening years. If, however, this welcome trend is to be sustained, and the targets set down by the 1994 Health Strategy 'Shaping a Healthier Future' and the Report of the Cardiovascular Health Strategy Group 'Building Healthier Hearts'in 1999 are to be realised, the implementation of proposed additional preventive and treatment strategies needs to proceed without delay.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Heart Foundation (IHF)en_GB
dc.subjectHEART FAILUREen_GB
dc.subjectMORTALITYen_GB
dc.title50 years of heart disease in Ireland: mortality, morbidity and health services implications.en_GB
dc.typeReporten
All Items in Lenus, The Irish Health Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.