Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/254053
Title:
Accreditation to advanced nurse practitioners and advanced midwife practitioners
Authors:
National Council for Professional Development of Nursing and Midwifery
Publisher:
National Council for Professional Development of Nursing and Midwifery
Issue Date:
Nov-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/254053
Item Type:
Report; Study
Language:
en
Description:
The National Council has undertaken research to provide a preliminary evaluation of the role of the ANP as part of its function in monitoring the ongoing development of specialist and advanced practice in nursing and midwifery (National Council for the Professional Development of Nursing and Midwifery 2005). The findings of the study indicate that the introduction of the role of the ANP in Ireland has been successful. The ANPs’ contribution to clinical patient/client care is clear. They are effective in delivering good quality, timely, holistic, and comprehensive care that is acceptable to patient/clients. They have been successful in implementing the role within the four core concepts (autonomy in clinical practice, expert practice, professional and clinical leadership and research) of advanced nursing/midwifery practice as defined by the National Council. This has been largely as a result of the enthusiasm, commitment, leadership and professionalism of the nurses who have been the first cohort of ANPs in Ireland and the nurse managers and multidisciplinary teams who have supported them. The majority of their time is spent in clinical practice and in associated activities and because of the overwhelming need for their services they reported finding time to undertake research difficult. The roles are spread over a wide variety of care areas indicating that roles have developed in response to health service need and that the definition and core concepts developed by the National Council for Ireland have been sufficiently comprehensive to support the development of nursing practice to respond to evolving needs. There has been wide acceptance of the ANP roles in the services where these first posts have been developed and this has been as a result of tireless working on the part of the nurses and other members of the multidisciplinary teams who have led practice. The strong clinical focus of the ANP role identified in this study suggests that one of the original aims of the Commission on Nursing (Government of Ireland 1998), namely to retain expert nurses in direct patient care, has been achieved.
Keywords:
NURSING; MIDWIFERY

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNational Council for Professional Development of Nursing and Midwiferyen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-29T22:20:05Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-29T22:20:05Z-
dc.date.issued2008-11-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/254053-
dc.descriptionThe National Council has undertaken research to provide a preliminary evaluation of the role of the ANP as part of its function in monitoring the ongoing development of specialist and advanced practice in nursing and midwifery (National Council for the Professional Development of Nursing and Midwifery 2005). The findings of the study indicate that the introduction of the role of the ANP in Ireland has been successful. The ANPs’ contribution to clinical patient/client care is clear. They are effective in delivering good quality, timely, holistic, and comprehensive care that is acceptable to patient/clients. They have been successful in implementing the role within the four core concepts (autonomy in clinical practice, expert practice, professional and clinical leadership and research) of advanced nursing/midwifery practice as defined by the National Council. This has been largely as a result of the enthusiasm, commitment, leadership and professionalism of the nurses who have been the first cohort of ANPs in Ireland and the nurse managers and multidisciplinary teams who have supported them. The majority of their time is spent in clinical practice and in associated activities and because of the overwhelming need for their services they reported finding time to undertake research difficult. The roles are spread over a wide variety of care areas indicating that roles have developed in response to health service need and that the definition and core concepts developed by the National Council for Ireland have been sufficiently comprehensive to support the development of nursing practice to respond to evolving needs. There has been wide acceptance of the ANP roles in the services where these first posts have been developed and this has been as a result of tireless working on the part of the nurses and other members of the multidisciplinary teams who have led practice. The strong clinical focus of the ANP role identified in this study suggests that one of the original aims of the Commission on Nursing (Government of Ireland 1998), namely to retain expert nurses in direct patient care, has been achieved.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNational Council for Professional Development of Nursing and Midwiferyen_GB
dc.subjectNURSINGen_GB
dc.subjectMIDWIFERYen_GB
dc.titleAccreditation to advanced nurse practitioners and advanced midwife practitionersen_GB
dc.typeReporten
dc.typeStudyen
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