Metabolic and hormonal aspects of polycystic ovary syndrome: the impact of diet.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/254001
Title:
Metabolic and hormonal aspects of polycystic ovary syndrome: the impact of diet.
Authors:
O'Connor, Annalouise; Gibney, James; Roche, Helen M
Affiliation:
Nutrigenomics Research Group, Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland.
Citation:
Metabolic and hormonal aspects of polycystic ovary syndrome: the impact of diet. 2010, 69 (4):628-35 Proc Nutr Soc
Publisher:
The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
Journal:
The Proceedings of the Nutrition Society
Issue Date:
Nov-2010
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/254001
DOI:
10.1017/S0029665110002016
PubMed ID:
20696094
Abstract:
Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common, chronic endocrine condition affecting young women of reproductive age. It is characterised by hyperandrogenaemia, and profound menstrual and ovulatory dysfunction with consequent sub-fertility. A clustering of metabolic aberrations is commonly associated with this condition and these include insulin resistance, disordered lipid metabolism and chronic low-grade inflammation. Overweight and obesity, as well as a degree of adipose tissue dysfunction, are present in a large proportion of women with PCOS, and where present, magnify the inherent hyperandrogenaemia characteristic of the condition, in addition to worsening the metabolic profile. Diet and lifestyle interventions are among the first-line treatments for PCOS, and weight reduction through energy restriction has been shown to exert positive influences on both metabolic and hormonal aspects of this condition. Alterations in carbohydrate amount and type have also been investigated, and more recently, dietary fatty acids, with a particular emphasis on PUFA, have been shown to have a positive impact within this population group. Although it is likely that diet is not the root cause of PCOS, it represents a modifiable variable with the potential to improve the health of women with this condition. Work to date has provided insights into the role of diet in PCOS; however, further work is required to determine the role of nutrients specifically within the context of PCOS, in order to develop more effective, evidence-based dietary guidelines for this condition.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adipose Tissue; Androgens; Dietary Fats; Fatty Acids, Unsaturated; Female; Humans; Obesity; Polycystic Ovary Syndrome; Weight Loss
ISSN:
0029-6651

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Annalouiseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGibney, Jamesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRoche, Helen Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-29T16:12:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-29T16:12:51Z-
dc.date.issued2010-11-
dc.identifier.citationMetabolic and hormonal aspects of polycystic ovary syndrome: the impact of diet. 2010, 69 (4):628-35 Proc Nutr Socen_GB
dc.identifier.issn0029-6651-
dc.identifier.pmid20696094-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0029665110002016-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/254001-
dc.description.abstractPolycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is a common, chronic endocrine condition affecting young women of reproductive age. It is characterised by hyperandrogenaemia, and profound menstrual and ovulatory dysfunction with consequent sub-fertility. A clustering of metabolic aberrations is commonly associated with this condition and these include insulin resistance, disordered lipid metabolism and chronic low-grade inflammation. Overweight and obesity, as well as a degree of adipose tissue dysfunction, are present in a large proportion of women with PCOS, and where present, magnify the inherent hyperandrogenaemia characteristic of the condition, in addition to worsening the metabolic profile. Diet and lifestyle interventions are among the first-line treatments for PCOS, and weight reduction through energy restriction has been shown to exert positive influences on both metabolic and hormonal aspects of this condition. Alterations in carbohydrate amount and type have also been investigated, and more recently, dietary fatty acids, with a particular emphasis on PUFA, have been shown to have a positive impact within this population group. Although it is likely that diet is not the root cause of PCOS, it represents a modifiable variable with the potential to improve the health of women with this condition. Work to date has provided insights into the role of diet in PCOS; however, further work is required to determine the role of nutrients specifically within the context of PCOS, in order to develop more effective, evidence-based dietary guidelines for this condition.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe Proceedings of the Nutrition Societyen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The Proceedings of the Nutrition Societyen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdipose Tissue-
dc.subject.meshAndrogens-
dc.subject.meshDietary Fats-
dc.subject.meshFatty Acids, Unsaturated-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshObesity-
dc.subject.meshPolycystic Ovary Syndrome-
dc.subject.meshWeight Loss-
dc.titleMetabolic and hormonal aspects of polycystic ovary syndrome: the impact of diet.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNutrigenomics Research Group, Conway Institute of Biomolecular and Biomedical Research, University College Dublin, Belfield, Dublin 4, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalThe Proceedings of the Nutrition Societyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
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