The detection of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia in Ireland.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/253658
Title:
The detection of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia in Ireland.
Authors:
O'Kane, Maurice J; Menown, Ian B; Graham, Ian; Maher, Vincent; Tomkin, Gerald; Nicholls, Paul; Graham, Colin
Affiliation:
Clinical Chemistry Laboratory, Altnagelvin Hospital, Londonderry, Northern Ireland. Maurice.OKane@westerntrust.hscni.net
Citation:
The detection of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia in Ireland. 2012, 29 (5):456-63 Adv Ther
Publisher:
Advances in therapy
Journal:
Advances in therapy
Issue Date:
May-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/253658
DOI:
10.1007/s12325-012-0021-0
PubMed ID:
22610724
Abstract:
Heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH) is an autosomal dominant condition with a population prevalence of 1 in 500, and is associated with significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. It may be caused by mutations in the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, apolipoprotein B100 (Apo B100), or proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) genes, with over 1,000 causative mutations described. Statin therapy in HeFH is considered effective and safe. Audit data suggest that approximately 80% of the putative HeFH population remains unidentified and, therefore, there is a need to develop a strategy for the identification of affected individuals so that early lipid-lowering treatment may be offered. There is good evidence showing the effectiveness and acceptability of HeFH screening programs in Europe. The authors describe a protocol for an all island approach to HeFH detection in the Republic of Ireland/Northern Ireland. Index cases will be identified by opportunistic screening using the Simon Broome, or Make Early Diagnosis to Prevent Early Death (MedPed) and World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Patients identified as "definite," "probable," or "possible" HeFH criteria will be offered genetic testing. The authors expect causative mutations to be identified in approximately 80% of patients with "definite" HeFH but in only approximately 20% of patients with "possible" HeFH. Cascade screening will be undertaken in first-degree relatives of the index case using genetic testing (where a causative mutation has been identified), or otherwise using LDL cholesterol concentration. The establishment of a HeFH screening program on an all-island basis will require: expansion of the existing molecular genetics diagnostic services, the establishment of a cohort of nurses/genetic counselors, a HeFH database to support cascade testing, the development of a network of lipid clinics (in a primary or secondary care setting), and an educational initiative to raise awareness of HeFH among healthcare professionals and the general population.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Cholesterol, LDL; Databases, Factual; Early Diagnosis; Genetic Counseling; Genetic Predisposition to Disease; Heterozygote Detection; Humans; Hyperlipoproteinemia Type II; Ireland; Mass Screening; Molecular Diagnostic Techniques; Northern Ireland
ISSN:
1865-8652

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Kane, Maurice Jen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMenown, Ian Ben_GB
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Ianen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMaher, Vincenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorTomkin, Geralden_GB
dc.contributor.authorNicholls, Paulen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Colinen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-28T12:12:42Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-28T12:12:42Z-
dc.date.issued2012-05-
dc.identifier.citationThe detection of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia in Ireland. 2012, 29 (5):456-63 Adv Theren_GB
dc.identifier.issn1865-8652-
dc.identifier.pmid22610724-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12325-012-0021-0-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/253658-
dc.description.abstractHeterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH) is an autosomal dominant condition with a population prevalence of 1 in 500, and is associated with significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. It may be caused by mutations in the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor, apolipoprotein B100 (Apo B100), or proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) genes, with over 1,000 causative mutations described. Statin therapy in HeFH is considered effective and safe. Audit data suggest that approximately 80% of the putative HeFH population remains unidentified and, therefore, there is a need to develop a strategy for the identification of affected individuals so that early lipid-lowering treatment may be offered. There is good evidence showing the effectiveness and acceptability of HeFH screening programs in Europe. The authors describe a protocol for an all island approach to HeFH detection in the Republic of Ireland/Northern Ireland. Index cases will be identified by opportunistic screening using the Simon Broome, or Make Early Diagnosis to Prevent Early Death (MedPed) and World Health Organization (WHO) criteria. Patients identified as "definite," "probable," or "possible" HeFH criteria will be offered genetic testing. The authors expect causative mutations to be identified in approximately 80% of patients with "definite" HeFH but in only approximately 20% of patients with "possible" HeFH. Cascade screening will be undertaken in first-degree relatives of the index case using genetic testing (where a causative mutation has been identified), or otherwise using LDL cholesterol concentration. The establishment of a HeFH screening program on an all-island basis will require: expansion of the existing molecular genetics diagnostic services, the establishment of a cohort of nurses/genetic counselors, a HeFH database to support cascade testing, the development of a network of lipid clinics (in a primary or secondary care setting), and an educational initiative to raise awareness of HeFH among healthcare professionals and the general population.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAdvances in therapyen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Advances in therapyen_GB
dc.subject.meshCholesterol, LDL-
dc.subject.meshDatabases, Factual-
dc.subject.meshEarly Diagnosis-
dc.subject.meshGenetic Counseling-
dc.subject.meshGenetic Predisposition to Disease-
dc.subject.meshHeterozygote Detection-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshHyperlipoproteinemia Type II-
dc.subject.meshIreland-
dc.subject.meshMass Screening-
dc.subject.meshMolecular Diagnostic Techniques-
dc.subject.meshNorthern Ireland-
dc.titleThe detection of heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia in Ireland.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentClinical Chemistry Laboratory, Altnagelvin Hospital, Londonderry, Northern Ireland. Maurice.OKane@westerntrust.hscni.neten_GB
dc.identifier.journalAdvances in therapyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
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