Homocysteine increases the risk associated with hyperlipidaemia.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/253493
Title:
Homocysteine increases the risk associated with hyperlipidaemia.
Authors:
Daly, Caroline; Fitzgerald, Anthony P; O'Callaghan, Patrick; Collins, Patrick; Cooney, Marie Therese; Graham, Ian M
Affiliation:
Royal Brompton Hospital, Sydney St, London, UK.
Citation:
Homocysteine increases the risk associated with hyperlipidaemia. 2009, 16 (2):150-5 Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabil
Publisher:
European journal of cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation : official journal of the European Society of Cardiology, Working Groups on Epidemiology & Prevention and Cardiac Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology
Journal:
European journal of cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation : official journal of the European Society of Cardiology, Working Groups on Epidemiology & Prevention and Cardiac Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiology
Issue Date:
Apr-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/253493
DOI:
10.1097/HJR.0b013e32831e1185
PubMed ID:
19276985
Abstract:
The European Concerted Action Project 'Homocysteine and Vascular Disease' showed that an elevated homocysteine is associated with a substantially increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and particularly when combined with other factors such as smoking, hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential interactions between homocysteine and individual lipid subfractions. In addition, it was hypothesized that HDL cholesterol may protect against hyperhomocysteinaemia because HDL cholesterol is associated with the enzyme paroxonase, which reduces oxidization of homocysteine to the harmful metabolite, homocysteine thiolactonase.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Apolipoprotein A-I; Apolipoproteins B; Biological Markers; Cardiovascular Diseases; Case-Control Studies; Cholesterol, HDL; Cholesterol, LDL; Europe; Female; Homocysteine; Humans; Hyperhomocysteinemia; Hyperlipidemias; Lipids; Logistic Models; Male; Middle Aged; Odds Ratio; Pilot Projects; Risk Assessment; Risk Factors; Triglycerides; Up-Regulation
ISSN:
1741-8275

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDaly, Carolineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, Anthony Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Callaghan, Patricken_GB
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Patricken_GB
dc.contributor.authorCooney, Marie Thereseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGraham, Ian Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-27T15:26:00Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-27T15:26:00Z-
dc.date.issued2009-04-
dc.identifier.citationHomocysteine increases the risk associated with hyperlipidaemia. 2009, 16 (2):150-5 Eur J Cardiovasc Prev Rehabilen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1741-8275-
dc.identifier.pmid19276985-
dc.identifier.doi10.1097/HJR.0b013e32831e1185-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/253493-
dc.description.abstractThe European Concerted Action Project 'Homocysteine and Vascular Disease' showed that an elevated homocysteine is associated with a substantially increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and particularly when combined with other factors such as smoking, hypertension and hypercholesterolaemia. The purpose of this study was to examine the potential interactions between homocysteine and individual lipid subfractions. In addition, it was hypothesized that HDL cholesterol may protect against hyperhomocysteinaemia because HDL cholesterol is associated with the enzyme paroxonase, which reduces oxidization of homocysteine to the harmful metabolite, homocysteine thiolactonase.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEuropean journal of cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation : official journal of the European Society of Cardiology, Working Groups on Epidemiology & Prevention and Cardiac Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiologyen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to European journal of cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation : official journal of the European Society of Cardiology, Working Groups on Epidemiology & Prevention and Cardiac Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshApolipoprotein A-I-
dc.subject.meshApolipoproteins B-
dc.subject.meshBiological Markers-
dc.subject.meshCardiovascular Diseases-
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies-
dc.subject.meshCholesterol, HDL-
dc.subject.meshCholesterol, LDL-
dc.subject.meshEurope-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHomocysteine-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshHyperhomocysteinemia-
dc.subject.meshHyperlipidemias-
dc.subject.meshLipids-
dc.subject.meshLogistic Models-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshOdds Ratio-
dc.subject.meshPilot Projects-
dc.subject.meshRisk Assessment-
dc.subject.meshRisk Factors-
dc.subject.meshTriglycerides-
dc.subject.meshUp-Regulation-
dc.titleHomocysteine increases the risk associated with hyperlipidaemia.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentRoyal Brompton Hospital, Sydney St, London, UK.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalEuropean journal of cardiovascular prevention and rehabilitation : official journal of the European Society of Cardiology, Working Groups on Epidemiology & Prevention and Cardiac Rehabilitation and Exercise Physiologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren

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