Scientific recommendations for a national infant feeding policy, 2nd edition

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/253492
Title:
Scientific recommendations for a national infant feeding policy, 2nd edition
Authors:
Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI)
Publisher:
Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI)
Issue Date:
2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/253492
Additional Links:
http://www.fsai.ie/scientificrecommendationsforanationalinfantfeedingpolicy.html
Item Type:
Technical Report
Language:
en
Description:
In 1999, the FSAI published ‘Recommendations for a National Infant Feeding Policy’. This report recognised that the period stretching from conception through to the end of the first year of life, is an important period of development. Diet (both maternal and infant) is one of the most critical environmental factors during this stage, influencing both growth and development during infancy, as well as having far-reaching effects on health in adult life. Over the past decade, new scientific evidence relating to infant feeding has emerged, and Ireland has responded by publishing reports and developing new policies, such as the vitamin D supplementation of infants and guidance on the safe preparation of powdered infant formula. In addition, new public health pressures such as rising childhood obesity exist within Ireland today. These changes are not reflected in the original FSAI report, therefore necessitating a revision of ‘Recommendations for a National Infant Feeding Policy’ (FSAI, 1999). Although a number of improvements in infant feeding practices have occurred within Ireland over the past 10 years, recent research has indicated that a number of key issues relating to milk and complementary feeding still exist. Breastfeeding is the biologically normal infant feeding method specifically adapted for optimum human growth, development and health. However, despite this, breastfeeding initiation and duration rates in Ireland remain far below other countries. Also, notwithstanding the continued prevalence of formula feeding, many parents do not know how to handle and prepare formula safely for their infants. Furthermore, the majority of infants continue to begin the weaning process before the recommended age, further highlighting the need for increased awareness of the correct infant feeding practices in Ireland today. More worryingly from a public health perspective, the types of weaning foods used are also inappropriate, and Dublin based research has shown that infants in Dublin receive high-fat, high-sugar confectionary foods more frequently than fruit and vegetables. The issue of parent and care-giver education needs to be addressed in order to improve this situation, and promote best practice in infant feeding across Ireland. This will help to ensure that infants in Ireland receive the best possible nutritional input; helping to protect their health both now and throughout later life.
Keywords:
FOOD SAFETY; INFANT NUTRITION; NUTRITION; VITAMIN; WEANING
ISBN:
1904465781

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFood Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-27T14:59:01Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-27T14:59:01Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.isbn1904465781-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/253492-
dc.descriptionIn 1999, the FSAI published ‘Recommendations for a National Infant Feeding Policy’. This report recognised that the period stretching from conception through to the end of the first year of life, is an important period of development. Diet (both maternal and infant) is one of the most critical environmental factors during this stage, influencing both growth and development during infancy, as well as having far-reaching effects on health in adult life. Over the past decade, new scientific evidence relating to infant feeding has emerged, and Ireland has responded by publishing reports and developing new policies, such as the vitamin D supplementation of infants and guidance on the safe preparation of powdered infant formula. In addition, new public health pressures such as rising childhood obesity exist within Ireland today. These changes are not reflected in the original FSAI report, therefore necessitating a revision of ‘Recommendations for a National Infant Feeding Policy’ (FSAI, 1999). Although a number of improvements in infant feeding practices have occurred within Ireland over the past 10 years, recent research has indicated that a number of key issues relating to milk and complementary feeding still exist. Breastfeeding is the biologically normal infant feeding method specifically adapted for optimum human growth, development and health. However, despite this, breastfeeding initiation and duration rates in Ireland remain far below other countries. Also, notwithstanding the continued prevalence of formula feeding, many parents do not know how to handle and prepare formula safely for their infants. Furthermore, the majority of infants continue to begin the weaning process before the recommended age, further highlighting the need for increased awareness of the correct infant feeding practices in Ireland today. More worryingly from a public health perspective, the types of weaning foods used are also inappropriate, and Dublin based research has shown that infants in Dublin receive high-fat, high-sugar confectionary foods more frequently than fruit and vegetables. The issue of parent and care-giver education needs to be addressed in order to improve this situation, and promote best practice in infant feeding across Ireland. This will help to ensure that infants in Ireland receive the best possible nutritional input; helping to protect their health both now and throughout later life.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFood Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI)en_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.fsai.ie/scientificrecommendationsforanationalinfantfeedingpolicy.htmlen_GB
dc.subjectFOOD SAFETYen_GB
dc.subjectINFANT NUTRITIONen_GB
dc.subjectNUTRITIONen_GB
dc.subjectVITAMINen_GB
dc.subjectWEANINGen_GB
dc.titleScientific recommendations for a national infant feeding policy, 2nd editionen_GB
dc.typeTechnical Reporten
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