The use of thrombin in the radiology department.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/252755
Title:
The use of thrombin in the radiology department.
Authors:
Ward, E; Buckley, O; Collins, A; Browne, R F; Torreggiani, W C
Affiliation:
Department of Radiology, Adelaide and Meath Hospitals incorporating the National Children's Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24, Ireland.
Citation:
The use of thrombin in the radiology department. 2009, 19 (3):670-8 Eur Radiol
Publisher:
European radiology
Journal:
European radiology
Issue Date:
Mar-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/252755
DOI:
10.1007/s00330-008-1198-0
PubMed ID:
18925399
Abstract:
Thrombin is a naturally occurring coagulation protein that converts soluble fibrinogen into insoluble fibrin and plays a vital role in the coagulation cascade and in turn haemostasis. Thrombin also promotes platelet activation. In the last few years, there has been a rapid increase in the use of thrombin by radiologists in a variety of clinical circumstances. It is best known for its use in the treatment of pseudoaneurysms following angiography. However, there are now a variety of cases in the literature describing the treatment of traumatic, inflammatory and infected aneurysms with thrombin in a variety of locations within the human body. There have even been recent reports describing the use of thrombin in conventional aneurysms as well as ruptured aneurysms. Its use has also been described in the treatment of endoleaks (type II) following aneurysm repair. In nearly all of these cases, treatment with thrombin requires imaging guidance. Recently, thrombin has also been used as a topical treatment post-percutaneous intervention to reduce or stop bleeding. Most radiologists have only a limited knowledge of the pharmacodynamics of thrombin, its wide range of utilisation and its limitations. Apart from a few case reports and case series, there is little in the radiological literature encompassing the wide range of applications that thrombin may have in the radiology department. In this review article, we comprehensively describe the role and pathophysiology of thrombin, describing with examples many of its potential uses. Techniques of usage as well as pitfalls and limitations are also described.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Aneurysm; Aneurysm, False; Coagulants; Hemorrhage; Hemostasis; Humans; Radiology; Thrombin; Tomography, X-Ray Computed; Ultrasonography
ISSN:
1432-1084

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWard, Een_GB
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, Oen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCollins, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrowne, R Fen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTorreggiani, W Cen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-20T10:13:50Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-20T10:13:50Z-
dc.date.issued2009-03-
dc.identifier.citationThe use of thrombin in the radiology department. 2009, 19 (3):670-8 Eur Radiolen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1432-1084-
dc.identifier.pmid18925399-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00330-008-1198-0-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/252755-
dc.description.abstractThrombin is a naturally occurring coagulation protein that converts soluble fibrinogen into insoluble fibrin and plays a vital role in the coagulation cascade and in turn haemostasis. Thrombin also promotes platelet activation. In the last few years, there has been a rapid increase in the use of thrombin by radiologists in a variety of clinical circumstances. It is best known for its use in the treatment of pseudoaneurysms following angiography. However, there are now a variety of cases in the literature describing the treatment of traumatic, inflammatory and infected aneurysms with thrombin in a variety of locations within the human body. There have even been recent reports describing the use of thrombin in conventional aneurysms as well as ruptured aneurysms. Its use has also been described in the treatment of endoleaks (type II) following aneurysm repair. In nearly all of these cases, treatment with thrombin requires imaging guidance. Recently, thrombin has also been used as a topical treatment post-percutaneous intervention to reduce or stop bleeding. Most radiologists have only a limited knowledge of the pharmacodynamics of thrombin, its wide range of utilisation and its limitations. Apart from a few case reports and case series, there is little in the radiological literature encompassing the wide range of applications that thrombin may have in the radiology department. In this review article, we comprehensively describe the role and pathophysiology of thrombin, describing with examples many of its potential uses. Techniques of usage as well as pitfalls and limitations are also described.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEuropean radiologyen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to European radiologyen_GB
dc.subject.meshAneurysm-
dc.subject.meshAneurysm, False-
dc.subject.meshCoagulants-
dc.subject.meshHemorrhage-
dc.subject.meshHemostasis-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshRadiology-
dc.subject.meshThrombin-
dc.subject.meshTomography, X-Ray Computed-
dc.subject.meshUltrasonography-
dc.titleThe use of thrombin in the radiology department.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Radiology, Adelaide and Meath Hospitals incorporating the National Children's Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalEuropean radiologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren

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