Dealing with bullying in schools: A consultation with children and young people

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/252454
Title:
Dealing with bullying in schools: A consultation with children and young people
Authors:
Ombudsman for Children Office (OCO)
Publisher:
Ombudsman for Children Office (OCO)
Issue Date:
2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/252454
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
It is estimated that there are at least 7,000 primary school and 3,700 post-primary school students who find it difficult to go to school every day as a result of being bullied frequently and that at least a further 24% of primary school students and 14% of postprimary school students have experienced bullying, albeit to a lesser extent.1 As has been outlined in the Ombudsman for Children’s annual reports to the Houses of the Oireachtas, the issue of bullying in schools is consistently raised with the OCO by parents. A significant majority of the more than 6,000 complaints dealt with by the OCO since its establishment have been made by parents on behalf of their children. On average, over 40 % of complaints made to the Office annually relate to education and bullying is consistently among the five issues raised most frequently in education-related complaints. Although the OCO has no role to investigate or substantiate allegations of bullying, it has had occasion to consider the manner in which such matters are dealt with in and by schools. In such cases, the OCO’s approach has been to promote the resolution of issues through local complaints procedures and, where necessary, to independently and impartially examine the matter further in order to arrive at an understanding of the issues involved and, where appropriate, make recommendations as regards how the matter might be resolved in the best interests of the child or children affected. From its consideration of complaints relating to bullying, the OCO is aware of a range of issues that can impede schools’ capacity to handle incidents of bullying effectively. Among these issues are: • Incidents of bullying can occur out of view of school staff (for example, in the toilets or school bus). Accordingly, there have been occasions where initial contact by the OCO with a school in relation to an issue concerning bullying is the first time the school has become aware of it. • Bullying behaviours can be symptomatic of diverse factors in a child’s life at home, in school, in his/her local community and/or in the wider society.2 As such, while schools have an important role to play in addressing bullying, they cannot carry sole responsibility for doing so and, where the issues involved are complex, they cannot be expected to handle the matter without the involvement and support of others. • There can be different – and divergent – views as regards the appropriate approach to dealing with specific incidents of bullying, including which policies and procedures to use and when, and the extent to and manner in which the children directly affected and their parents/carers should be involved in efforts to resolve the matter.
Keywords:
BULLYING; CHILD HEALTH

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOmbudsman for Children Office (OCO)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-16T13:32:57Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-16T13:32:57Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/252454-
dc.descriptionIt is estimated that there are at least 7,000 primary school and 3,700 post-primary school students who find it difficult to go to school every day as a result of being bullied frequently and that at least a further 24% of primary school students and 14% of postprimary school students have experienced bullying, albeit to a lesser extent.1 As has been outlined in the Ombudsman for Children’s annual reports to the Houses of the Oireachtas, the issue of bullying in schools is consistently raised with the OCO by parents. A significant majority of the more than 6,000 complaints dealt with by the OCO since its establishment have been made by parents on behalf of their children. On average, over 40 % of complaints made to the Office annually relate to education and bullying is consistently among the five issues raised most frequently in education-related complaints. Although the OCO has no role to investigate or substantiate allegations of bullying, it has had occasion to consider the manner in which such matters are dealt with in and by schools. In such cases, the OCO’s approach has been to promote the resolution of issues through local complaints procedures and, where necessary, to independently and impartially examine the matter further in order to arrive at an understanding of the issues involved and, where appropriate, make recommendations as regards how the matter might be resolved in the best interests of the child or children affected. From its consideration of complaints relating to bullying, the OCO is aware of a range of issues that can impede schools’ capacity to handle incidents of bullying effectively. Among these issues are: • Incidents of bullying can occur out of view of school staff (for example, in the toilets or school bus). Accordingly, there have been occasions where initial contact by the OCO with a school in relation to an issue concerning bullying is the first time the school has become aware of it. • Bullying behaviours can be symptomatic of diverse factors in a child’s life at home, in school, in his/her local community and/or in the wider society.2 As such, while schools have an important role to play in addressing bullying, they cannot carry sole responsibility for doing so and, where the issues involved are complex, they cannot be expected to handle the matter without the involvement and support of others. • There can be different – and divergent – views as regards the appropriate approach to dealing with specific incidents of bullying, including which policies and procedures to use and when, and the extent to and manner in which the children directly affected and their parents/carers should be involved in efforts to resolve the matter.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOmbudsman for Children Office (OCO)en_GB
dc.subjectBULLYINGen_GB
dc.subjectCHILD HEALTHen_GB
dc.titleDealing with bullying in schools: A consultation with children and young peopleen_GB
dc.typeReporten
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