Effect of a family focused active play intervention on sedentary time and physical activity in preschool children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/252452
Title:
Effect of a family focused active play intervention on sedentary time and physical activity in preschool children
Authors:
O’Dwyer, Mareesa V; Fairclough, Stuart J; Knowles, Zoe; Stratton, Gareth
Citation:
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. 2012 Oct 01;9(1):117
Issue Date:
1-Oct-2012
URI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1479-5868-9-117; http://hdl.handle.net/10147/252452
Abstract:
Abstract Background Early childhood provides a window of opportunity for the promotion of physical activity. Given the limited effectiveness of interventions to date, new approaches are needed. Socio-ecological models suggest that involving parents as intervention targets may be effective in fostering healthier lifestyles in children. This study describes the effectiveness of a family-focused ‘Active Play’ intervention in decreasing sedentary time and increasing total physical activity in preschool children. Method Seventy-seven families were recruited from 8 randomly selected SureStart children’s centres in the North West of England. Centres were randomly assigned to either an intervention (n = 4) or a comparison group (n = 4). Parents and children in the intervention group received a 10-week active play programme delivered by trained active play professionals; this included an activity and educational component. Families in the comparison group were asked to maintain their usual routine. Each participating parent and child wore a uni-axial accelerometer for 7 days at baseline and post-test. Week and weekend day sedentary time and total physical activity adjusted for child- and home- level covariates were analysed using multilevel analyses. Results Significant intervention effects were observed for sedentary time and physical activity for both week and weekend days. Children in the intervention group engaged in 1.5% and 4.3% less sedentary time during week and weekend days, respectively and 4.5% and 13.1% more physical activity during week and weekend days, respectively than children in the comparison group. Parent’s participation in sport and their physical activity levels, child’s sex, availability of media in the home and attendance at organised activities were significant predictors of sedentary time and physical activity in this age group. Conclusion A 10-week family focused active play intervention produced positive changes in sedentary time and total physical activity levels in preschool children. Specific covariates were identified as having a significant effect on the outcome measures. Moreover, children whose parents were active engaged in less sedentary time and more physical activity suggesting that parent’s activity habits are mediators of physical activity engagement in this age group.
Item Type:
Journal Article

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO’Dwyer, Mareesa V-
dc.contributor.authorFairclough, Stuart J-
dc.contributor.authorKnowles, Zoe-
dc.contributor.authorStratton, Gareth-
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-16T13:21:30Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-16T13:21:30Z-
dc.date.issued2012-10-01-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity. 2012 Oct 01;9(1):117-
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1479-5868-9-117-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/252452-
dc.description.abstractAbstract Background Early childhood provides a window of opportunity for the promotion of physical activity. Given the limited effectiveness of interventions to date, new approaches are needed. Socio-ecological models suggest that involving parents as intervention targets may be effective in fostering healthier lifestyles in children. This study describes the effectiveness of a family-focused ‘Active Play’ intervention in decreasing sedentary time and increasing total physical activity in preschool children. Method Seventy-seven families were recruited from 8 randomly selected SureStart children’s centres in the North West of England. Centres were randomly assigned to either an intervention (n = 4) or a comparison group (n = 4). Parents and children in the intervention group received a 10-week active play programme delivered by trained active play professionals; this included an activity and educational component. Families in the comparison group were asked to maintain their usual routine. Each participating parent and child wore a uni-axial accelerometer for 7 days at baseline and post-test. Week and weekend day sedentary time and total physical activity adjusted for child- and home- level covariates were analysed using multilevel analyses. Results Significant intervention effects were observed for sedentary time and physical activity for both week and weekend days. Children in the intervention group engaged in 1.5% and 4.3% less sedentary time during week and weekend days, respectively and 4.5% and 13.1% more physical activity during week and weekend days, respectively than children in the comparison group. Parent’s participation in sport and their physical activity levels, child’s sex, availability of media in the home and attendance at organised activities were significant predictors of sedentary time and physical activity in this age group. Conclusion A 10-week family focused active play intervention produced positive changes in sedentary time and total physical activity levels in preschool children. Specific covariates were identified as having a significant effect on the outcome measures. Moreover, children whose parents were active engaged in less sedentary time and more physical activity suggesting that parent’s activity habits are mediators of physical activity engagement in this age group.-
dc.titleEffect of a family focused active play intervention on sedentary time and physical activity in preschool children-
dc.typeJournal Article-
dc.language.rfc3066en-
dc.rights.holderMareesa V O’Dwyer et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewed-
dc.date.updated2012-11-12T20:02:46Z-
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