Life as a child and young person in Ireland - report of a national consultation

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/252234
Title:
Life as a child and young person in Ireland - report of a national consultation
Authors:
Coyne, Imelda; Dempsey, Orla; Comiskey, Catherine; O'Donnell, Anne
Affiliation:
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublin
Publisher:
Government Publications, Dublin
Issue Date:
Nov-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/252234
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
This report, Life as a Child and Young Person in Ireland: Report of a National Consultation, documents the views of 66,705 children and young people. This national consultation was conducted to inform development of the Children and Young People’s Policy Framework by the Department of Children and Youth Affairs, which will set out the key policy objectives for the next five years. During 2010, the Department of Children and Youth Affairs (DCYA) (formerly the Office of the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, OMCYA) developed the concept and methodology for a children and young people’s consultation. It was agreed that children and young people in every school and Youthreach centre in the country would be invited to complete short questionnaires containing three open questions. The questions for the primary school children were devised at a consultation with 7-12 year-olds conducted by the OMCYA in November 2010. The three questions devised by children for the primary school children were: 1. What’s the best thing about being a child in Ireland? 2. What’s the worst thing about being a child in Ireland? 3. What one thing would you change in Ireland for children to be happy? Questions for young people were formulated by the OMCYA’s Children and Young People’s Forum (CYPF) in 2010. The CYPF consists of 35 young people, aged 12-18, from all parts of the country. They are nominated to the CYPF through Comhairle na nÓg and organisations representing seldom-heard children/young people. The three questions for second-level young people were: 1. What do you think is good about being a young person living in Ireland? 2. What do you dislike about being a young person in Ireland? 3. If you were leader of the country, what one thing would you change for young people? An Oversight Committee was established in November 2010 to work in partnership with the DCYA on developing and implementing the consultation process. This committee was comprised of representatives from the DCYA, the Department of Education and Skills, the two national associations of school principals, second-level teachers, primary school teachers, national parent associations, the student council co-ordinator (second-level), children and young people from the DCYA Children and Young People’s Forum, and other key stakeholders. These stakeholders played a critical role in advising on the most effective way to conduct the consultation process. It was decided that the consultation process would be managed by experts in seeking the views of children and young people, and conducting analysis of such findings. Accordingly, in January 2011, a consultation team, led by Professor Imelda Coyne and Professor Catherine Comiskey from the School of Nursing and Midwifery in Trinity College Dublin, was contracted to manage and run the national consultation in cooperation with the DCYA. The consultation was underpinned by Article 12 of the United Nation’s Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) (UN, 1989), which entails respecting children’s views and using child-centred research methods. In keeping with the spirit of the UNCRC, the DCYA decided that the consultation should provide an opportunity for the maximum number of children and young people in the country to express their views. This was achieved by targeting all children and young people enrolled in the Irish education system. This is the second time that a consultation has been conducted to inform a National Children’s Strategy or Policy Framework in Ireland. The first public consultation was carried out in 1999 to inform Our Children – Their Lives: National Children’s Strategy 2000-2010, during the ‘Celtic Tiger’ era in Ireland – an age of economic boom, prosperity, high employment and infinite opportunity. In contrast, the present consultation took place in 2011 and was conducted in an age of austerity, rising unemployment and emigration, and increased uncertainty as to what the future holds for many families.
Keywords:
CHILD; CHILD HEALTH
ISBN:
9781406427158

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCoyne, Imeldaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDempsey, Orlaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorComiskey, Catherineen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Donnell, Anneen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-15T12:04:28Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-15T12:04:28Z-
dc.date.issued2012-11-
dc.identifier.isbn9781406427158-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/252234-
dc.descriptionThis report, Life as a Child and Young Person in Ireland: Report of a National Consultation, documents the views of 66,705 children and young people. This national consultation was conducted to inform development of the Children and Young People’s Policy Framework by the Department of Children and Youth Affairs, which will set out the key policy objectives for the next five years. During 2010, the Department of Children and Youth Affairs (DCYA) (formerly the Office of the Minister for Children and Youth Affairs, OMCYA) developed the concept and methodology for a children and young people’s consultation. It was agreed that children and young people in every school and Youthreach centre in the country would be invited to complete short questionnaires containing three open questions. The questions for the primary school children were devised at a consultation with 7-12 year-olds conducted by the OMCYA in November 2010. The three questions devised by children for the primary school children were: 1. What’s the best thing about being a child in Ireland? 2. What’s the worst thing about being a child in Ireland? 3. What one thing would you change in Ireland for children to be happy? Questions for young people were formulated by the OMCYA’s Children and Young People’s Forum (CYPF) in 2010. The CYPF consists of 35 young people, aged 12-18, from all parts of the country. They are nominated to the CYPF through Comhairle na nÓg and organisations representing seldom-heard children/young people. The three questions for second-level young people were: 1. What do you think is good about being a young person living in Ireland? 2. What do you dislike about being a young person in Ireland? 3. If you were leader of the country, what one thing would you change for young people? An Oversight Committee was established in November 2010 to work in partnership with the DCYA on developing and implementing the consultation process. This committee was comprised of representatives from the DCYA, the Department of Education and Skills, the two national associations of school principals, second-level teachers, primary school teachers, national parent associations, the student council co-ordinator (second-level), children and young people from the DCYA Children and Young People’s Forum, and other key stakeholders. These stakeholders played a critical role in advising on the most effective way to conduct the consultation process. It was decided that the consultation process would be managed by experts in seeking the views of children and young people, and conducting analysis of such findings. Accordingly, in January 2011, a consultation team, led by Professor Imelda Coyne and Professor Catherine Comiskey from the School of Nursing and Midwifery in Trinity College Dublin, was contracted to manage and run the national consultation in cooperation with the DCYA. The consultation was underpinned by Article 12 of the United Nation’s Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) (UN, 1989), which entails respecting children’s views and using child-centred research methods. In keeping with the spirit of the UNCRC, the DCYA decided that the consultation should provide an opportunity for the maximum number of children and young people in the country to express their views. This was achieved by targeting all children and young people enrolled in the Irish education system. This is the second time that a consultation has been conducted to inform a National Children’s Strategy or Policy Framework in Ireland. The first public consultation was carried out in 1999 to inform Our Children – Their Lives: National Children’s Strategy 2000-2010, during the ‘Celtic Tiger’ era in Ireland – an age of economic boom, prosperity, high employment and infinite opportunity. In contrast, the present consultation took place in 2011 and was conducted in an age of austerity, rising unemployment and emigration, and increased uncertainty as to what the future holds for many families.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGovernment Publications, Dublinen_GB
dc.subjectCHILDen_GB
dc.subjectCHILD HEALTHen_GB
dc.titleLife as a child and young person in Ireland - report of a national consultationen_GB
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentSchool of Nursing and Midwifery, Trinity College Dublinen_GB
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