Laparoscopic colonic resection in inflammatory bowel disease: minimal surgery, minimal access and minimal hospital stay.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/251974
Title:
Laparoscopic colonic resection in inflammatory bowel disease: minimal surgery, minimal access and minimal hospital stay.
Authors:
Boyle, E; Ridgway, P F; Keane, F B; Neary, P
Affiliation:
Division of Colorectal Surgery, Minimally Invasive Surgery Tallaght, Adelaide, Ireland.
Citation:
Laparoscopic colonic resection in inflammatory bowel disease: minimal surgery, minimal access and minimal hospital stay. 2008, 10 (9):911-5 Colorectal Dis
Publisher:
Colorectal disease : the official journal of the Association
Journal:
Colorectal disease : the official journal of the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Ireland
Issue Date:
Nov-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/251974
DOI:
10.1111/j.1463-1318.2008.01518.x
PubMed ID:
19037931
Abstract:
Laparoscopic surgery for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is technically demanding but can offer improved short-term outcomes. The introduction of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) as the default operative approach for IBD, however, may have inherent learning curve-associated disadvantages. We hypothesise that the establishment of MIS as the standard operative approach does not increase patient morbidity as assessed in the initial period of its introduction into a specialised unit, and that it confers earlier postoperative gastrointestinal recovery and reduced hospitalisation compared with conventional open resection.
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adult; Aged; Case-Control Studies; Colectomy; Colon; Female; Humans; Inflammatory Bowel Diseases; Laparoscopy; Length of Stay; Male; Middle Aged; Young Adult
ISSN:
1463-1318

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBoyle, Een_GB
dc.contributor.authorRidgway, P Fen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKeane, F Ben_GB
dc.contributor.authorNeary, Pen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-13T11:20:03Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-13T11:20:03Z-
dc.date.issued2008-11-
dc.identifier.citationLaparoscopic colonic resection in inflammatory bowel disease: minimal surgery, minimal access and minimal hospital stay. 2008, 10 (9):911-5 Colorectal Disen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1463-1318-
dc.identifier.pmid19037931-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1463-1318.2008.01518.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/251974-
dc.description.abstractLaparoscopic surgery for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is technically demanding but can offer improved short-term outcomes. The introduction of minimally invasive surgery (MIS) as the default operative approach for IBD, however, may have inherent learning curve-associated disadvantages. We hypothesise that the establishment of MIS as the standard operative approach does not increase patient morbidity as assessed in the initial period of its introduction into a specialised unit, and that it confers earlier postoperative gastrointestinal recovery and reduced hospitalisation compared with conventional open resection.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherColorectal disease : the official journal of the Associationen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Colorectal disease : the official journal of the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Irelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAged-
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studies-
dc.subject.meshColectomy-
dc.subject.meshColon-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshInflammatory Bowel Diseases-
dc.subject.meshLaparoscopy-
dc.subject.meshLength of Stay-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult-
dc.titleLaparoscopic colonic resection in inflammatory bowel disease: minimal surgery, minimal access and minimal hospital stay.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentDivision of Colorectal Surgery, Minimally Invasive Surgery Tallaght, Adelaide, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalColorectal disease : the official journal of the Association of Coloproctology of Great Britain and Irelanden_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren

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