Recommendations for a food and nutrition policy for Ireland 1995

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/251935
Title:
Recommendations for a food and nutrition policy for Ireland 1995
Authors:
Nutrition Advisory Group
Publisher:
Government of Ireland
Issue Date:
1995
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/251935
Language:
en
Description:
We are fortunate in Ireland in 1995, as we commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Great Famine, to enjoy a standard of living which should make it possible for all our people to have access to sufficient food. A diet which includes a wide variety of food can promote health and wellbeing, as well as providing pleasure and enjoyment. Ireland has a high death rate from diseases which are associated with modern western lifestyles. Diet is one factor leading to these diseases, but smoking, alcohol. activity and other aspects of lifestyle are also important. There have been improvements in recent years, with declines in tobacco consumption and some changes in eating patterns. There has been a decline in death rates from lung cancer in young men and reductions in deaths from heart disease and stroke in men and women in the younger age groups. Nevertheless, life expectancy in middle age in Irish men and women continues to compare unfavourably with that in other developed countries. Economic well being is probably the most important determinant of the health of any population. The agriculture and food sectors are a major contributor to the Irish economy providing income, directly and indirectly, to many of our people. We can take pride in producing fresh. wholesome food in a clean and unpolluted environment. However, our agriculture and food sectors are heavily dependent on the continuing markets for our meat and dairy produce. A substantial pro portion of our other food requirements are imported, particularly cereals, vegetables and fruit. It is the role of government to ensure access to a range of foodstuffs by the population and particularly by vulnerable groups. Given the high prevalence of nutrition-related diseases in Ireland and the increasing consumer awareness of health issues, it is vital that the Irish food industry be encouraged and supported to produce a greater range of foods, to meet the nutrition requirements of our people. This is quite compatible with the continued expansion and development of the sector, given t hat nutrition and health issues are receiving increasing attention in many of the countries with which we do business. The Nutrition Advisory Group is not advocating radical changes in the national diet. Rather it is proposed t hat there should be a continuation of current trends, with a gradual reduction in the quantity of fat and a modest alteration in the balance of fats consumed, and increased consumption of carbohydrate foods, vegetables, fruit and fish. Many of the discussions of the Group concluded by recommending that further research should be undertaken. Priority should be given to acquiring basic information on current nutrient intakes by the population and by different age, sex and social groups. Research is also required into the potential for prevention of those nutrition-related diseases which have a high incidence in Ireland.
Keywords:
POLICY FORMULATION; FOOD AND NUTRITION

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNutrition Advisory Groupen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-13T09:27:14Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-13T09:27:14Z-
dc.date.issued1995-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/251935-
dc.descriptionWe are fortunate in Ireland in 1995, as we commemorate the 150th anniversary of the Great Famine, to enjoy a standard of living which should make it possible for all our people to have access to sufficient food. A diet which includes a wide variety of food can promote health and wellbeing, as well as providing pleasure and enjoyment. Ireland has a high death rate from diseases which are associated with modern western lifestyles. Diet is one factor leading to these diseases, but smoking, alcohol. activity and other aspects of lifestyle are also important. There have been improvements in recent years, with declines in tobacco consumption and some changes in eating patterns. There has been a decline in death rates from lung cancer in young men and reductions in deaths from heart disease and stroke in men and women in the younger age groups. Nevertheless, life expectancy in middle age in Irish men and women continues to compare unfavourably with that in other developed countries. Economic well being is probably the most important determinant of the health of any population. The agriculture and food sectors are a major contributor to the Irish economy providing income, directly and indirectly, to many of our people. We can take pride in producing fresh. wholesome food in a clean and unpolluted environment. However, our agriculture and food sectors are heavily dependent on the continuing markets for our meat and dairy produce. A substantial pro portion of our other food requirements are imported, particularly cereals, vegetables and fruit. It is the role of government to ensure access to a range of foodstuffs by the population and particularly by vulnerable groups. Given the high prevalence of nutrition-related diseases in Ireland and the increasing consumer awareness of health issues, it is vital that the Irish food industry be encouraged and supported to produce a greater range of foods, to meet the nutrition requirements of our people. This is quite compatible with the continued expansion and development of the sector, given t hat nutrition and health issues are receiving increasing attention in many of the countries with which we do business. The Nutrition Advisory Group is not advocating radical changes in the national diet. Rather it is proposed t hat there should be a continuation of current trends, with a gradual reduction in the quantity of fat and a modest alteration in the balance of fats consumed, and increased consumption of carbohydrate foods, vegetables, fruit and fish. Many of the discussions of the Group concluded by recommending that further research should be undertaken. Priority should be given to acquiring basic information on current nutrient intakes by the population and by different age, sex and social groups. Research is also required into the potential for prevention of those nutrition-related diseases which have a high incidence in Ireland.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGovernment of Irelanden_GB
dc.subjectPOLICY FORMULATIONen_GB
dc.subjectFOOD AND NUTRITIONen_GB
dc.titleRecommendations for a food and nutrition policy for Ireland 1995en_GB
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