Impact of a new electronic handover system in surgery.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/251920
Title:
Impact of a new electronic handover system in surgery.
Authors:
Ryan, S; O'Riordan, J M; Tierney, S; Conlon, K C; Ridgway, P F
Affiliation:
Department of Surgery, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Adelaide & Meath Hospital Incorporating National Children's Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24, Ireland.
Citation:
Impact of a new electronic handover system in surgery. 2011, 9 (3):217-20 Int J Surg
Publisher:
International journal of surgery
Journal:
International journal of surgery (London, England)
Issue Date:
2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/251920
DOI:
10.1016/j.ijsu.2010.11.012
PubMed ID:
21129508
Abstract:
Accurate handover of clinical information is imperative to ensure continuity of patient care, patient safety and reduction in clinical errors. Verbal and paper-based handovers are common practice in many institutions but the potential for clinical errors and inefficiency is significant. We have recently introduced an electronic templated signout to improve clarity of transfer of patient details post-surgical take. The aim of this study was to prospectively audit the introduction of this new electronic handover in our hospital with particular emphasis regarding efficacy and efficiency. The primary surrogate chosen to assess efficacy and efficiency was length of stay for those patients admitted through the emergency department. To do this we compared two separate, two-week periods before and after the introduction of this new electronic signout format. Users were not informed of the study. Information recorded on the signout included details of the emergency admissions, consults received on call and any issues with regard to inpatients. ASA grade, time to first intervention and admission diagnosis were also recorded. Our results show that introduction of this electronic signout significantly reduced median length of stay from five to four days (P=0.047). No significant difference in ASA grades, time to first intervention or overall admission diagnosis was obtained between the two time periods. In conclusion, this is the first study to show that the introduction of electronic signout post-call was associated with a significant reduction in patient length of stay and provided better continuity of care than the previously used paper-based handover.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Communication; Continuity of Patient Care; Efficiency, Organizational; Emergency Service, Hospital; Humans; Length of Stay; Referral and Consultation; Workflow
ISSN:
1743-9159

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRyan, Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Riordan, J Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorTierney, Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorConlon, K Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRidgway, P Fen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-13T09:26:35Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-13T09:26:35Z-
dc.date.issued2011-
dc.identifier.citationImpact of a new electronic handover system in surgery. 2011, 9 (3):217-20 Int J Surgen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1743-9159-
dc.identifier.pmid21129508-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.ijsu.2010.11.012-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/251920-
dc.description.abstractAccurate handover of clinical information is imperative to ensure continuity of patient care, patient safety and reduction in clinical errors. Verbal and paper-based handovers are common practice in many institutions but the potential for clinical errors and inefficiency is significant. We have recently introduced an electronic templated signout to improve clarity of transfer of patient details post-surgical take. The aim of this study was to prospectively audit the introduction of this new electronic handover in our hospital with particular emphasis regarding efficacy and efficiency. The primary surrogate chosen to assess efficacy and efficiency was length of stay for those patients admitted through the emergency department. To do this we compared two separate, two-week periods before and after the introduction of this new electronic signout format. Users were not informed of the study. Information recorded on the signout included details of the emergency admissions, consults received on call and any issues with regard to inpatients. ASA grade, time to first intervention and admission diagnosis were also recorded. Our results show that introduction of this electronic signout significantly reduced median length of stay from five to four days (P=0.047). No significant difference in ASA grades, time to first intervention or overall admission diagnosis was obtained between the two time periods. In conclusion, this is the first study to show that the introduction of electronic signout post-call was associated with a significant reduction in patient length of stay and provided better continuity of care than the previously used paper-based handover.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational journal of surgeryen_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International journal of surgery (London, England)en_GB
dc.subject.meshCommunication-
dc.subject.meshContinuity of Patient Care-
dc.subject.meshEfficiency, Organizational-
dc.subject.meshEmergency Service, Hospital-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshLength of Stay-
dc.subject.meshReferral and Consultation-
dc.subject.meshWorkflow-
dc.titleImpact of a new electronic handover system in surgery.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Surgery, University of Dublin, Trinity College, Adelaide & Meath Hospital Incorporating National Children's Hospital, Tallaght, Dublin 24, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of surgery (London, England)en_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren

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