Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/251873
Title:
COX-2, VEGF and tumour angiogenesis.
Authors:
Toomey, D P; Murphy, J F; Conlon, K C
Affiliation:
Professorial Surgical Unit, University of Dublin, Trinity College, The Trinity Centre for Health Sciences, Adelaide & Meath Hospital Inc. NCH, Tallaght, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
COX-2, VEGF and tumour angiogenesis. 2009, 7 (3):174-80 Surgeon
Publisher:
The surgeon : journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Ireland
Journal:
The surgeon : journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Ireland
Issue Date:
Jun-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/251873
PubMed ID:
19580182
Abstract:
Epidemiological evidence suggests a protective effective of regular NSAID use against developing cancer. Cyclooxygenase-2, a target of NSAIDs, is upregulated in many cancers and has been associated with increased VEGF production and angiogenesis. Angiogenesis is the formation of new vessels from existing vasculature and as an essential process for tumour development represents an important therapeutic target. Following an extensive review of the literature this article details the current knowledge on the role of COX-2 in tumorigenesis focusing on its relationship to angiogenesis and VEGF production by tumour cells. While COX-2 is clearly detrimental to prognosis and NSAIDs have a beneficial effect, the possibility of COX-2 independent effects being partly or wholly responsible for this benefit cannot be excluded.
Language:
en
MeSH:
Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal; Cyclooxygenase 2; Dinoprostone; Humans; Neoplasms; Neovascularization, Physiologic; Up-Regulation; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A
ISSN:
1479-666X

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorToomey, D Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurphy, J Fen_GB
dc.contributor.authorConlon, K Cen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-12T16:21:44Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-12T16:21:44Z-
dc.date.issued2009-06-
dc.identifier.citationCOX-2, VEGF and tumour angiogenesis. 2009, 7 (3):174-80 Surgeonen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1479-666X-
dc.identifier.pmid19580182-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/251873-
dc.description.abstractEpidemiological evidence suggests a protective effective of regular NSAID use against developing cancer. Cyclooxygenase-2, a target of NSAIDs, is upregulated in many cancers and has been associated with increased VEGF production and angiogenesis. Angiogenesis is the formation of new vessels from existing vasculature and as an essential process for tumour development represents an important therapeutic target. Following an extensive review of the literature this article details the current knowledge on the role of COX-2 in tumorigenesis focusing on its relationship to angiogenesis and VEGF production by tumour cells. While COX-2 is clearly detrimental to prognosis and NSAIDs have a beneficial effect, the possibility of COX-2 independent effects being partly or wholly responsible for this benefit cannot be excluded.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThe surgeon : journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Irelanden_GB
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The surgeon : journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Irelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshAnti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal-
dc.subject.meshCyclooxygenase 2-
dc.subject.meshDinoprostone-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshNeoplasms-
dc.subject.meshNeovascularization, Physiologic-
dc.subject.meshUp-Regulation-
dc.subject.meshVascular Endothelial Growth Factor A-
dc.titleCOX-2, VEGF and tumour angiogenesis.en_GB
dc.contributor.departmentProfessorial Surgical Unit, University of Dublin, Trinity College, The Trinity Centre for Health Sciences, Adelaide & Meath Hospital Inc. NCH, Tallaght, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalThe surgeon : journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Irelanden_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren

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