Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/251579
Title:
First report of the Department of Health 1945-1949
Authors:
Department of Health (DoH)
Publisher:
Department of Health (DoH)
Issue Date:
1949
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/251579
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The four year period ending 31st March, 1949, covered by this Report saw several important changes in health administration in this country. Perhaps the most notable of these was the creation of a Department of State charged solely with the administration of the health services. The Department of Health was established on the 22nd January, 1947, by Order made by the Government pursuant to Section 2 of the Ministers and Secretaries (Amendment) Act, 1946. In 1947 the Health Act was enacted. This had been preceded in the year 1945 by the Mental Treatment Act. These measures laid the foundation for what it is hoped will be a greatly improved health service for the community at large and a new method of handling mental ill health. The four years with which the Report deals also witnessed other and more tangible progress in health matters. The tuberculosis scourge was vigorously tackled with satisfactory results; free treatment for cases of infectious disease and maintenance allowances for sufferers from such diseases were introduced; the health services for mothers and children were reviewed and plans were laid for their improvement. The vital statistics for the period show continued improvement in the general death rate, in those for mothers and infants and in the individual rates for most diseases. Fevers which up to recent times took a heavy toll continued to recede steadily, both as to their incidence and mortality. This Report gives an account of the health activities of the Department of Local Government and Public Health, (which was responsible for health functions until the Department of Health was established) and subsequently of the Department of Health, and what they accomplished during the period of the review. Much was done in the direction of improving the foundations of our health services and providing better facilities for the avoidance and the cure of illness. In common with every other country, there remains much to be accomplished in the prevention of illness and the cure of disease. The difficulties financial, educative and psychological in the way of attaining the goal of improved health services for all are formidable and it would be rash to hope for spectacular results over a short period. It is reasonable to hope, however, that the work of recent years will bear fruit in good measure in the near future. In the case of tuberculosis, the facilities for preventive and curative treatment now are better than they were five years ago and the improvements may be claimed to be showing good results already; the mind of the public has been directed by health propaganda and by financial inducements towards seeking early diagnosis and treatment. The free treatment now provided for all other infectious diseases will undoubtedly assist in their prevention and control. The appointment of specialists in the Local Authority Service for different ailments is being accelerated. The back-log of hospital building is being vigorously tackled; and the new hospitals and clinics towards the planning of which a considerable effort is being directed will bring earlier and better treatment of disease nearer to the public in general, and in much greater measure. It is hoped also that mothers and infants will, within a few years' time, be able to obtain all the improved health attention which they need.
Keywords:
HEALTH; POLICY FORMULATION

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDepartment of Health (DoH)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-09T11:58:15Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-09T11:58:15Z-
dc.date.issued1949-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/251579-
dc.descriptionThe four year period ending 31st March, 1949, covered by this Report saw several important changes in health administration in this country. Perhaps the most notable of these was the creation of a Department of State charged solely with the administration of the health services. The Department of Health was established on the 22nd January, 1947, by Order made by the Government pursuant to Section 2 of the Ministers and Secretaries (Amendment) Act, 1946. In 1947 the Health Act was enacted. This had been preceded in the year 1945 by the Mental Treatment Act. These measures laid the foundation for what it is hoped will be a greatly improved health service for the community at large and a new method of handling mental ill health. The four years with which the Report deals also witnessed other and more tangible progress in health matters. The tuberculosis scourge was vigorously tackled with satisfactory results; free treatment for cases of infectious disease and maintenance allowances for sufferers from such diseases were introduced; the health services for mothers and children were reviewed and plans were laid for their improvement. The vital statistics for the period show continued improvement in the general death rate, in those for mothers and infants and in the individual rates for most diseases. Fevers which up to recent times took a heavy toll continued to recede steadily, both as to their incidence and mortality. This Report gives an account of the health activities of the Department of Local Government and Public Health, (which was responsible for health functions until the Department of Health was established) and subsequently of the Department of Health, and what they accomplished during the period of the review. Much was done in the direction of improving the foundations of our health services and providing better facilities for the avoidance and the cure of illness. In common with every other country, there remains much to be accomplished in the prevention of illness and the cure of disease. The difficulties financial, educative and psychological in the way of attaining the goal of improved health services for all are formidable and it would be rash to hope for spectacular results over a short period. It is reasonable to hope, however, that the work of recent years will bear fruit in good measure in the near future. In the case of tuberculosis, the facilities for preventive and curative treatment now are better than they were five years ago and the improvements may be claimed to be showing good results already; the mind of the public has been directed by health propaganda and by financial inducements towards seeking early diagnosis and treatment. The free treatment now provided for all other infectious diseases will undoubtedly assist in their prevention and control. The appointment of specialists in the Local Authority Service for different ailments is being accelerated. The back-log of hospital building is being vigorously tackled; and the new hospitals and clinics towards the planning of which a considerable effort is being directed will bring earlier and better treatment of disease nearer to the public in general, and in much greater measure. It is hoped also that mothers and infants will, within a few years' time, be able to obtain all the improved health attention which they need.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDepartment of Health (DoH)en_GB
dc.subjectHEALTHen_GB
dc.subjectPOLICY FORMULATIONen_GB
dc.titleFirst report of the Department of Health 1945-1949en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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