Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/251397
Title:
Policy coherence: notes towards a concept
Authors:
Pike, Brigid; Coherent Policy Expert Group; Muscat, Richard
Is Part Of:
Reflections on the concept of coherency for a policy on psychoactive substances and beyond
Affiliation:
Health Research Board (HRB)
Publisher:
Council of Europe Publishing
Issue Date:
Mar-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/251397
Item Type:
Book Chapter
Language:
en
Description:
According to the Oxford English Dictionary, coherence means “the action or fact of cleaving or sticking together”, while coherency means “the quality of being coherent or hanging together in any respect” – one is an action; the other is a quality. In this chapter, “coherence” is used when referring to policy coherence as a policy tool, because it connotes a process of becoming more, or less, coherent; “coherency” is used for the goal, the final state to be achieved by implementing the policy coherence instrument, a set of fully coherent policies. Following the characterisation of “policy coherence” given in the previous chapter, a more formal definition of the concept is now proposed. Policy coherence refers to the extent to which different public policies complement or support each other. At best, policy coherence creates synergies between different public policies; it leverages capacity to realise a common policy goal. At a minimum, it ensures that different policies do not undermine one another or cancel each other out. A consequence of this layered definition (layered in that there are gradations, namely, ever greater degrees of coherence) is that policy coherence depends on alignment and consistency not only across policies directly related to a specific goal or set of goals, but also across other unrelated policies that may have an impact on directly related policies. A further consequence is that coherence at different levels, from international to local, also needs to be considered.
Keywords:
POLICY FORMULATION; SUBSTANCE MISUSE; POLICY MAKER
Local subject classification:
COHERENCE
ISBN:
978-92-871-7345-4
Sponsors:
Copyright is held by the Council of Europe. © Council of Europe, March 2012 Reproduced with permission.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPike, Brigiden_GB
dc.contributor.authorCoherent Policy Expert Groupen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMuscat, Richarden_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-11-08T10:03:23Z-
dc.date.available2012-11-08T10:03:23Z-
dc.date.issued2012-03-
dc.identifier.isbn978-92-871-7345-4-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/251397-
dc.descriptionAccording to the Oxford English Dictionary, coherence means “the action or fact of cleaving or sticking together”, while coherency means “the quality of being coherent or hanging together in any respect” – one is an action; the other is a quality. In this chapter, “coherence” is used when referring to policy coherence as a policy tool, because it connotes a process of becoming more, or less, coherent; “coherency” is used for the goal, the final state to be achieved by implementing the policy coherence instrument, a set of fully coherent policies. Following the characterisation of “policy coherence” given in the previous chapter, a more formal definition of the concept is now proposed. Policy coherence refers to the extent to which different public policies complement or support each other. At best, policy coherence creates synergies between different public policies; it leverages capacity to realise a common policy goal. At a minimum, it ensures that different policies do not undermine one another or cancel each other out. A consequence of this layered definition (layered in that there are gradations, namely, ever greater degrees of coherence) is that policy coherence depends on alignment and consistency not only across policies directly related to a specific goal or set of goals, but also across other unrelated policies that may have an impact on directly related policies. A further consequence is that coherence at different levels, from international to local, also needs to be considered.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipCopyright is held by the Council of Europe. © Council of Europe, March 2012 Reproduced with permission.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCouncil of Europe Publishingen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofReflections on the concept of coherency for a policy on psychoactive substances and beyonden_GB
dc.subjectPOLICY FORMULATIONen_GB
dc.subjectSUBSTANCE MISUSEen_GB
dc.subjectPOLICY MAKERen_GB
dc.subject.otherCOHERENCEen_GB
dc.titlePolicy coherence: notes towards a concepten_GB
dc.typeBook Chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Research Board (HRB)en_GB
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