National Maternity Hospital Dublin Clinical report: Centenary year 1994

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/250132
Title:
National Maternity Hospital Dublin Clinical report: Centenary year 1994
Authors:
National Maternity Hospital (NMH)
Publisher:
National Maternity Hospital (NMH)
Issue Date:
1994
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/250132
Abstract:
On March 17th, 1894 the National Maternity Hospital was opened. During its first year of operation, 308 women were admitted. There were 230 women delivered, 87 first births and 143 multiparous women; 46 women were admitted to the gynaecological wards . An additional 208 women were attended on the district. One woman was recorded as suffering from smallpox, there were no Caesarean deliveries and the forceps rate was recorded as 10%. A typical complicated labour was described as the woman spending eleven hours in the first stage and eight and a half hours in the second stage of labour. There is no record in the first year of the number of maternal deaths, but, at the time, the maternal mortality rate in Dublin was of the order of 350 per 100,000 deliveries. The main causes of maternal mortality at the time wife puerperal fever, hypertensive disorders, and haemorrhage associated with miscarriage, placental separation, and postpartum. There were about 10,000 babies born in the Dublin area each year in the 1890's and so there would have been approximately 35 maternal deaths in anyone year at that time.
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Keywords:
HOSPITALS; MANAGEMENT AND POLICY

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNational Maternity Hospital (NMH)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-24T22:29:06Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-24T22:29:06Z-
dc.date.issued1994-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/250132-
dc.description.abstractOn March 17th, 1894 the National Maternity Hospital was opened. During its first year of operation, 308 women were admitted. There were 230 women delivered, 87 first births and 143 multiparous women; 46 women were admitted to the gynaecological wards . An additional 208 women were attended on the district. One woman was recorded as suffering from smallpox, there were no Caesarean deliveries and the forceps rate was recorded as 10%. A typical complicated labour was described as the woman spending eleven hours in the first stage and eight and a half hours in the second stage of labour. There is no record in the first year of the number of maternal deaths, but, at the time, the maternal mortality rate in Dublin was of the order of 350 per 100,000 deliveries. The main causes of maternal mortality at the time wife puerperal fever, hypertensive disorders, and haemorrhage associated with miscarriage, placental separation, and postpartum. There were about 10,000 babies born in the Dublin area each year in the 1890's and so there would have been approximately 35 maternal deaths in anyone year at that time.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNational Maternity Hospital (NMH)en_GB
dc.subjectHOSPITALSen_GB
dc.subjectMANAGEMENT AND POLICYen_GB
dc.titleNational Maternity Hospital Dublin Clinical report: Centenary year 1994en_GB
dc.typeReporten
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
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