The value of folic acid in the prevention of neural tube defects: report to the Minister for Health Children

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/249844
Title:
The value of folic acid in the prevention of neural tube defects: report to the Minister for Health Children
Authors:
Food Safety Advisory Board
Publisher:
Food Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI)
Issue Date:
Jul-1977
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/249844
Item Type:
Software
Language:
en
Description:
Neural tube defects are severe congenital malformations of the central nervous system which occur more frequently in Ireland than in most other countries with an estimated current prevalence of 1.5 per 1,000 births. It was scientifically proven in 1991 char the B vitamin, folic acid, taken before conception and during the early months of pregnancy (i .e. periconceptionally) could greatly reduce a woman's risk of having an affected pregnancy. During the next two years, departments of health in many countries issued recommendations on how women could reduce their risk of having a baby with a neural tube defect by taking extra folic acid or folate. In 1993 the Irish Department of Health issued a recommendation that women likely to become pregnant should take an extra 400 microgrammes (mcg) of folic acid prior to conception and during the first twelve weeks of pregnancy. Research studies confirmed anecdotal reports that relatively few Irish women were taking folic acid periconceptionally. Amid growing concerns about the apparent low uptake of this effective intervention, the Food Safety Advisory Board established a Sub-Committee on Folic Acid and Neural Tube Defects with the following terms of reference: "To 'examine and prepare a report on issues relating to increasing the intake of folic acid periconceptionally to prevent neural tube defects in Ireland, and to make recommendations".
Keywords:
FOOD SAFETY; NEURAL TUBE DEFECTS; FOLIC ACID

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFood Safety Advisory Boarden_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-23T08:58:37Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-23T08:58:37Z-
dc.date.issued1977-07-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/249844-
dc.descriptionNeural tube defects are severe congenital malformations of the central nervous system which occur more frequently in Ireland than in most other countries with an estimated current prevalence of 1.5 per 1,000 births. It was scientifically proven in 1991 char the B vitamin, folic acid, taken before conception and during the early months of pregnancy (i .e. periconceptionally) could greatly reduce a woman's risk of having an affected pregnancy. During the next two years, departments of health in many countries issued recommendations on how women could reduce their risk of having a baby with a neural tube defect by taking extra folic acid or folate. In 1993 the Irish Department of Health issued a recommendation that women likely to become pregnant should take an extra 400 microgrammes (mcg) of folic acid prior to conception and during the first twelve weeks of pregnancy. Research studies confirmed anecdotal reports that relatively few Irish women were taking folic acid periconceptionally. Amid growing concerns about the apparent low uptake of this effective intervention, the Food Safety Advisory Board established a Sub-Committee on Folic Acid and Neural Tube Defects with the following terms of reference: "To 'examine and prepare a report on issues relating to increasing the intake of folic acid periconceptionally to prevent neural tube defects in Ireland, and to make recommendations".en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFood Safety Authority of Ireland (FSAI)en_GB
dc.subjectFOOD SAFETYen_GB
dc.subjectNEURAL TUBE DEFECTSen_GB
dc.subjectFOLIC ACIDen_GB
dc.titleThe value of folic acid in the prevention of neural tube defects: report to the Minister for Health Childrenen_GB
dc.typeSoftwareen
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