National Council for the Aged report on its three year term of office June 1981 to May 1984

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/249841
Title:
National Council for the Aged report on its three year term of office June 1981 to May 1984
Authors:
National Council for the Aged
Publisher:
National Council for the Aged
Issue Date:
1984
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/249841
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The establishment of the National Council for the Aged in 1981 demonstrated a recognition by Government of the growing importance of the many issues relating to the elderly and to ageing, an awareness which is increasing world-wide as populations age and the number of elderly people increase at a very rapid pace. In 1950, according to United Nation's estimates, there were approximately 200 million persons 60 years of age and over throughout the world. By 1975, their number had increased to 350 million. United Nation's projections to the year 2000 indicate that the number will increase to 590 million, and by the year 2025 to over 1,100 million; that is an increase of 224 per cent since 1975.1 In Ireland too, the elderly population has been increasing steadily. Taking the number of persons aged 65 and over, for example, it increased from 329,800 to 369,000 in the decade between 1971 and 1981. This however, because of the age structure in the Irish population, represented a decrease in the percentage of the elderly relative to the population as a whole, from 11 .1 percent to 10.7 per cent. In 1981 there were 131,900 people in the country aged 75 and over. The numbers of such persons is projected to increase by 13.4 per cent in the decade to 1991 i.e. at a faster rate than the population as a whole (11.1 per cent). At present, women account for 55 per cent of all elderly persons and 63 per cent of those aged 80 and over. In 1979 there were 60,100 elderly people living alone in Ireland, an increase of almost 40 per cent on 1971; and in this category, women outnumber men by almost 2: I. In Ireland today, women of 65 have a life expectancy of 15.7 years compared to 12.8 years for men of the same age. By 1991, 18.8 per cent of the elderly population will be over 80 years of age. Clearly these very significant increases in the numbers of elderly Irish men and women present a challenge to our whole society
Keywords:
OLDER PEOPLE; HEALTH CARE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNational Council for the Ageden_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-23T08:57:03Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-23T08:57:03Z-
dc.date.issued1984-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/249841-
dc.descriptionThe establishment of the National Council for the Aged in 1981 demonstrated a recognition by Government of the growing importance of the many issues relating to the elderly and to ageing, an awareness which is increasing world-wide as populations age and the number of elderly people increase at a very rapid pace. In 1950, according to United Nation's estimates, there were approximately 200 million persons 60 years of age and over throughout the world. By 1975, their number had increased to 350 million. United Nation's projections to the year 2000 indicate that the number will increase to 590 million, and by the year 2025 to over 1,100 million; that is an increase of 224 per cent since 1975.1 In Ireland too, the elderly population has been increasing steadily. Taking the number of persons aged 65 and over, for example, it increased from 329,800 to 369,000 in the decade between 1971 and 1981. This however, because of the age structure in the Irish population, represented a decrease in the percentage of the elderly relative to the population as a whole, from 11 .1 percent to 10.7 per cent. In 1981 there were 131,900 people in the country aged 75 and over. The numbers of such persons is projected to increase by 13.4 per cent in the decade to 1991 i.e. at a faster rate than the population as a whole (11.1 per cent). At present, women account for 55 per cent of all elderly persons and 63 per cent of those aged 80 and over. In 1979 there were 60,100 elderly people living alone in Ireland, an increase of almost 40 per cent on 1971; and in this category, women outnumber men by almost 2: I. In Ireland today, women of 65 have a life expectancy of 15.7 years compared to 12.8 years for men of the same age. By 1991, 18.8 per cent of the elderly population will be over 80 years of age. Clearly these very significant increases in the numbers of elderly Irish men and women present a challenge to our whole societyen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNational Council for the Ageden_GB
dc.subjectOLDER PEOPLEen_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH CAREen_GB
dc.titleNational Council for the Aged report on its three year term of office June 1981 to May 1984en_GB
dc.typeReporten
All Items in Lenus,the Irish health repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.