Sectoral study of the Irish private nursing home industry

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/248578
Title:
Sectoral study of the Irish private nursing home industry
Authors:
Irish Registered Nursing Home Association
Publisher:
Irish Registered Nursing Homes Associaton
Issue Date:
Apr-1995
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/248578
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
KPMG Management Consulting were appointed by the Irish Registered Nursing Homes Association (IRNHA), formerly the Irish Private Nursing Homes Association, to conduct a sectoral study of the private nursing homes industry in Ireland. The objectives of this study were to review the private nursing home industry in terms of its structure, the supply of nursing homes and the demand in Ireland for long stay geriatric care. In examining the cost structures within the sector, the financial analysis presented in this report provides a breakdown of the costs of care by home size, health board region and by home location. Market Supply The supply of private nursing homes varies considerably in terms of type and size of home. The total supply of private and voluntary nursing homes has increased by 21 % from 299 in 1989 to 361 in 1995. In 1989, 27% of nursing homes in the private sector were voluntary homes run by religious or charitable organisations. The number of voluntary homes in 1995 was 57 representing only 16% of private nursing homes. Commercial nursing homes have reduced in size. In 1989 the average number of beds per home was 27.2. The most recent figures for 1995 show that the average home size has dropped to 24.2, representing an average decrease of 3 beds per home. Overall, the average home size, including voluntary and commercial homes is 28.9 beds. The total supply of homes in the private sector in March 1995 was 361 homes providing 10,425 beds. The number of beds provided by commercial homes has increased from 5,936 in 1989 to 7,355 in 1995. The Eastern Health Board (EHB) region represented 30.1 % of the national private nursing home supply in 1989. The growth in the supply of homes in the EHB region was higher than the national average of 21 %. The number of nursing homes in the EHB region increased from 90 in 1989 to 117 in 1995. The monthly returns by the Health Boards on the implementation of the Health (Nursing Homes) Act 1990 for 1994 would indicate that the supply of nursing homes is continuing to increase. In December 1994 373 applications for registration had been received by the Health Boards from nursing homes. Proportionately, 16% of these homes were voluntary homes.
Keywords:
NURSING HOMES; GERIATRICS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorIrish Registered Nursing Home Associationen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-12T13:55:23Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-12T13:55:23Z-
dc.date.issued1995-04-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/248578-
dc.descriptionKPMG Management Consulting were appointed by the Irish Registered Nursing Homes Association (IRNHA), formerly the Irish Private Nursing Homes Association, to conduct a sectoral study of the private nursing homes industry in Ireland. The objectives of this study were to review the private nursing home industry in terms of its structure, the supply of nursing homes and the demand in Ireland for long stay geriatric care. In examining the cost structures within the sector, the financial analysis presented in this report provides a breakdown of the costs of care by home size, health board region and by home location. Market Supply The supply of private nursing homes varies considerably in terms of type and size of home. The total supply of private and voluntary nursing homes has increased by 21 % from 299 in 1989 to 361 in 1995. In 1989, 27% of nursing homes in the private sector were voluntary homes run by religious or charitable organisations. The number of voluntary homes in 1995 was 57 representing only 16% of private nursing homes. Commercial nursing homes have reduced in size. In 1989 the average number of beds per home was 27.2. The most recent figures for 1995 show that the average home size has dropped to 24.2, representing an average decrease of 3 beds per home. Overall, the average home size, including voluntary and commercial homes is 28.9 beds. The total supply of homes in the private sector in March 1995 was 361 homes providing 10,425 beds. The number of beds provided by commercial homes has increased from 5,936 in 1989 to 7,355 in 1995. The Eastern Health Board (EHB) region represented 30.1 % of the national private nursing home supply in 1989. The growth in the supply of homes in the EHB region was higher than the national average of 21 %. The number of nursing homes in the EHB region increased from 90 in 1989 to 117 in 1995. The monthly returns by the Health Boards on the implementation of the Health (Nursing Homes) Act 1990 for 1994 would indicate that the supply of nursing homes is continuing to increase. In December 1994 373 applications for registration had been received by the Health Boards from nursing homes. Proportionately, 16% of these homes were voluntary homes.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish Registered Nursing Homes Associatonen_GB
dc.subjectNURSING HOMESen_GB
dc.subjectGERIATRICSen_GB
dc.titleSectoral study of the Irish private nursing home industryen_GB
dc.typeReporten
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