Rotunda Hospital Dublin clinical report 1st January 2000 to 31st January 2000

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/247483
Title:
Rotunda Hospital Dublin clinical report 1st January 2000 to 31st January 2000
Authors:
Rotunda Hospital Dublin
Publisher:
Rotunda Hospital Dublin
Issue Date:
2000
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/247483
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
In 2000 the Rotunda delivered 6211 mothers of 6310 babies. There were 65 perinatal deaths (8 of these were unbooked) giving an uncorrected perinatal mortality rate of 9.0. At least part of the increase in the perinatal mortality rate is due to the occurrence of unusual pathology peculiar to the increased number of non-national patients delivering in Ireland. Examples of these pathologies would be intrauterine syphilis and intrauterine malaria. In addition to unusual pathologies a large number of non-nationals have not been able to avail of antenatal care, due to their late arrival in Ireland. The continued increase in the number of non-nationals delivering in the hospital has put a considerable strain on diminishing midwifery numbers. In 1999 we delivered approximately 500 non-nationals and in 2000 we delivered approximately 850. These figures have continued to rise in 2001 and now approximately 20% of the mothers delivering in this hospital are now newly arrived non#nationals. At a time when health care issues have never been discussed so widely and dissatisfaction so frequently expressed, it is paradoxical that so many people are travelling to this country to avail of health care facilities in the maternity hospitals. The demographics of Dublin continue to change rapidly and in ways that could not have been predicted as recently as four or five years ago. The Rotunda was able to deal with the arrival of non-nationals with relatively minor adjustments until recently when the proportion has grown to such an extent that the increased workload and complexity has presented real challenges for the institution to cope with. It is unfortunate that the subject of non-nationals and refugees in Ireland produces such polarised responses that moderate discussion and reasonable planning appear overwhelmed. The continued decline in the number of midwifery staff available is a serious source of concern to the hospital. Whilst the buoyancy in the Irish economy have contributed to this shortage by offering many attractive I employment options to traditional midwifery students, there is no doubt that until the role of the midwife is acknowledged in financial terms their numbers will continue to be in short supply. This year the hospital started a pilot project of direct entry to midwifery studies and it is hoped that this will have some contribution to make to alleviating the shortage of midwives in years to come.
Keywords:
BIRTH RATE; PERINATAL MORTALITY

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRotunda Hospital Dublinen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T09:07:44Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T09:07:44Z-
dc.date.issued2000-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/247483-
dc.descriptionIn 2000 the Rotunda delivered 6211 mothers of 6310 babies. There were 65 perinatal deaths (8 of these were unbooked) giving an uncorrected perinatal mortality rate of 9.0. At least part of the increase in the perinatal mortality rate is due to the occurrence of unusual pathology peculiar to the increased number of non-national patients delivering in Ireland. Examples of these pathologies would be intrauterine syphilis and intrauterine malaria. In addition to unusual pathologies a large number of non-nationals have not been able to avail of antenatal care, due to their late arrival in Ireland. The continued increase in the number of non-nationals delivering in the hospital has put a considerable strain on diminishing midwifery numbers. In 1999 we delivered approximately 500 non-nationals and in 2000 we delivered approximately 850. These figures have continued to rise in 2001 and now approximately 20% of the mothers delivering in this hospital are now newly arrived non#nationals. At a time when health care issues have never been discussed so widely and dissatisfaction so frequently expressed, it is paradoxical that so many people are travelling to this country to avail of health care facilities in the maternity hospitals. The demographics of Dublin continue to change rapidly and in ways that could not have been predicted as recently as four or five years ago. The Rotunda was able to deal with the arrival of non-nationals with relatively minor adjustments until recently when the proportion has grown to such an extent that the increased workload and complexity has presented real challenges for the institution to cope with. It is unfortunate that the subject of non-nationals and refugees in Ireland produces such polarised responses that moderate discussion and reasonable planning appear overwhelmed. The continued decline in the number of midwifery staff available is a serious source of concern to the hospital. Whilst the buoyancy in the Irish economy have contributed to this shortage by offering many attractive I employment options to traditional midwifery students, there is no doubt that until the role of the midwife is acknowledged in financial terms their numbers will continue to be in short supply. This year the hospital started a pilot project of direct entry to midwifery studies and it is hoped that this will have some contribution to make to alleviating the shortage of midwives in years to come.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRotunda Hospital Dublinen_GB
dc.subjectBIRTH RATEen_GB
dc.subjectPERINATAL MORTALITYen_GB
dc.titleRotunda Hospital Dublin clinical report 1st January 2000 to 31st January 2000en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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