2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/247475
Title:
Report of the Adoption Board 1997
Authors:
Adoption Board
Publisher:
Stationery Office
Issue Date:
1998
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/247475
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
This is the final Report of the present Board whose term of office finishes on the 29th January, 1998. The Board received 108 applications for domestic adoption orders in respect of children placed by Registered Adoption Societies and Health Boards in 1997 compared to 152 applications for declarations of eligibility and suitability to adopt a child from overseas under Section 5(1)(iii)(II) of the Adoption Act, 1991. In total the Board received 431 applications for adoption of Irish children of will be 269 were in respect of family adoptions. The Board made 422 Irish adoption orders and recognised 148 foreign adoption orders. In the five years of its existence this Board has witnessed dramatic changes in adoption practice and trends, changes which are reflective of the rapid pace of developments in Irish social life over the period. Despite these changes the Board is obliged to continue to operate within a legislative framework which is ill-equipped to cater for current adoption needs. The Board is still largely operating under a system devised in 1952. Arising out of this there are short falls and inconsistencies in the system which should be urgently addressed by the introduction of modern consolidated legislation. The Board calls for the modernisation of adoption legislation and an amalgamation of the adoption code. It notes that current law consists of six separate pieces of legislation and that the Adoption (No.2) Bill, 1996 which was withdrawn from the Seanad would have brought the total to seven separate pieces of legislation. The Board considers that there is an urgent need to consolidate the adoption code into one comprehensive piece of legislation to bring adoption law into the 21st century. The Board notes the changing nature of the domestic adoption scene with the trend towards a more unified adoption service being provided by the Health Boards and less involvement from the Registered Adoption Societies. During 1996 St Brigid's Adoption Society was deregistered and St Patrick's Guild Adoption Society and the Rotunda Girls Aid Society made a decision to cease to place children for adoption. However, all three societies continue to provide a tracing service for their clients. In total four societies deregistered during the lifetime of tills Board. The decision by some societies to deregister was a natural consequence of the declining number of children being placed for adoption by birth mothers
Keywords:
ADOPTION; STATISTICS
Series/Report no.:
Pn 4997

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAdoption Boarden_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T09:05:29Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T09:05:29Z-
dc.date.issued1998-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/247475-
dc.descriptionThis is the final Report of the present Board whose term of office finishes on the 29th January, 1998. The Board received 108 applications for domestic adoption orders in respect of children placed by Registered Adoption Societies and Health Boards in 1997 compared to 152 applications for declarations of eligibility and suitability to adopt a child from overseas under Section 5(1)(iii)(II) of the Adoption Act, 1991. In total the Board received 431 applications for adoption of Irish children of will be 269 were in respect of family adoptions. The Board made 422 Irish adoption orders and recognised 148 foreign adoption orders. In the five years of its existence this Board has witnessed dramatic changes in adoption practice and trends, changes which are reflective of the rapid pace of developments in Irish social life over the period. Despite these changes the Board is obliged to continue to operate within a legislative framework which is ill-equipped to cater for current adoption needs. The Board is still largely operating under a system devised in 1952. Arising out of this there are short falls and inconsistencies in the system which should be urgently addressed by the introduction of modern consolidated legislation. The Board calls for the modernisation of adoption legislation and an amalgamation of the adoption code. It notes that current law consists of six separate pieces of legislation and that the Adoption (No.2) Bill, 1996 which was withdrawn from the Seanad would have brought the total to seven separate pieces of legislation. The Board considers that there is an urgent need to consolidate the adoption code into one comprehensive piece of legislation to bring adoption law into the 21st century. The Board notes the changing nature of the domestic adoption scene with the trend towards a more unified adoption service being provided by the Health Boards and less involvement from the Registered Adoption Societies. During 1996 St Brigid's Adoption Society was deregistered and St Patrick's Guild Adoption Society and the Rotunda Girls Aid Society made a decision to cease to place children for adoption. However, all three societies continue to provide a tracing service for their clients. In total four societies deregistered during the lifetime of tills Board. The decision by some societies to deregister was a natural consequence of the declining number of children being placed for adoption by birth mothersen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherStationery Officeen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPn 4997en_GB
dc.subjectADOPTIONen_GB
dc.subjectSTATISTICSen_GB
dc.titleReport of the Adoption Board 1997en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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