2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/247474
Title:
Report of the Adoption Board 1996
Authors:
Adoption Board
Publisher:
Stationery Office
Issue Date:
Jul-1997
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/247474
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The Board received 407 applications for adoption orders in 1996, the lowest ever figure since adoption was introduced in 1953. Applications for the adoption of children placed by registered adoption societies and the health boards continued to decline. These amounted to a total of 127 applications. The corresponding figure for 1995 was 143 applications. Applications for children being adopted within their natural family decreased from 274 in 1995 to 241 in 1996. The Board made 405 adoption orders in 1996 compared with 490 in 1995. Family adoptions accounted for 243 orders, of which 230 were made in favour of the child's birth mother and her husband. There were 141 orders made in respect of health board and registered adoption society placements. The Board made seven adoption orders under the Adoption Act, 1988. Further information on applications under this Act is given on page 9 of this report. In 1996 the Board made two adoption orders for Irish children with special needs. Whereas there is a large decrease in the number of children being adopted in Ireland the interest in overseas adoption continues to grow. During 1996 the Board recognised 117 foreign adoptions under the terms of the Adoption Act, 1991. To date the Board has recognised 696 foreign adoptions. In 1996, the Board made 117 declarations of suitability and eligibility under Section 5 of the Act. It also extended the declarations of suitability and eligibility of 32 couples who had not effected the adoption of a foreign child during the existence of their original declaration. In 1996 the Board considered over 700 enquiries from adoptees, birth mothers and siblings seeking access to their birth records or contact. The Board noted an increase in the number of adoptees requesting a copy of their original birth certificate. Some want access to their birth certificate to assist them in tracing their birth parents while others merely wish to have a copy of their original birth certificate. The Board is aware that some people are making their own enquiries in the absence of appropriate professional counselling and that in some instances the wrong people have been contacted. This has obviously caused unnecessary stress to those tracing and to those who were contacted. The Board notes that in most jurisdictions there is automatic access to birth records for adoptees over eighteen years of age and requests that consideration be given to bringing in the necessary legislation to govern this issue. It considers that there should be a right of access to these records but that some form of mandatory counselling should be availed of before the release of any birth certificate. The Board has submitted proposals to the Department of Health on the matter. During 1996 the Board continued to receive an increasing number of enquiries from people wishing to trace their birth mothers and from birth mothers wishing to contact their children. Agencies and adoption societies reported an increased demand for a comprehensive tracing service during the year. The Board has been calling for the establishment of a National Contact Register for the last numbers of years. It has had detailed discussions with the statutory and the non-statutory agencies involved in adoption work concerning the establishment of a Register. The Board has also had discussions with Mr Austin Currie T.D., Minister of State at the Department of Health and with representatives of the Department of Health and has made detailed proposals in this regard. The Board again calls for the establishment of a National Contact Register to assist all those who seek to make contact. The media coverage surrounding the controversy in relation to children sent outside the
Keywords:
ADOPTION; STATISTICS
Series/Report no.:
P50659

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAdoption Boarden_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-08T09:05:18Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-08T09:05:18Z-
dc.date.issued1997-07-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/247474-
dc.descriptionThe Board received 407 applications for adoption orders in 1996, the lowest ever figure since adoption was introduced in 1953. Applications for the adoption of children placed by registered adoption societies and the health boards continued to decline. These amounted to a total of 127 applications. The corresponding figure for 1995 was 143 applications. Applications for children being adopted within their natural family decreased from 274 in 1995 to 241 in 1996. The Board made 405 adoption orders in 1996 compared with 490 in 1995. Family adoptions accounted for 243 orders, of which 230 were made in favour of the child's birth mother and her husband. There were 141 orders made in respect of health board and registered adoption society placements. The Board made seven adoption orders under the Adoption Act, 1988. Further information on applications under this Act is given on page 9 of this report. In 1996 the Board made two adoption orders for Irish children with special needs. Whereas there is a large decrease in the number of children being adopted in Ireland the interest in overseas adoption continues to grow. During 1996 the Board recognised 117 foreign adoptions under the terms of the Adoption Act, 1991. To date the Board has recognised 696 foreign adoptions. In 1996, the Board made 117 declarations of suitability and eligibility under Section 5 of the Act. It also extended the declarations of suitability and eligibility of 32 couples who had not effected the adoption of a foreign child during the existence of their original declaration. In 1996 the Board considered over 700 enquiries from adoptees, birth mothers and siblings seeking access to their birth records or contact. The Board noted an increase in the number of adoptees requesting a copy of their original birth certificate. Some want access to their birth certificate to assist them in tracing their birth parents while others merely wish to have a copy of their original birth certificate. The Board is aware that some people are making their own enquiries in the absence of appropriate professional counselling and that in some instances the wrong people have been contacted. This has obviously caused unnecessary stress to those tracing and to those who were contacted. The Board notes that in most jurisdictions there is automatic access to birth records for adoptees over eighteen years of age and requests that consideration be given to bringing in the necessary legislation to govern this issue. It considers that there should be a right of access to these records but that some form of mandatory counselling should be availed of before the release of any birth certificate. The Board has submitted proposals to the Department of Health on the matter. During 1996 the Board continued to receive an increasing number of enquiries from people wishing to trace their birth mothers and from birth mothers wishing to contact their children. Agencies and adoption societies reported an increased demand for a comprehensive tracing service during the year. The Board has been calling for the establishment of a National Contact Register for the last numbers of years. It has had detailed discussions with the statutory and the non-statutory agencies involved in adoption work concerning the establishment of a Register. The Board has also had discussions with Mr Austin Currie T.D., Minister of State at the Department of Health and with representatives of the Department of Health and has made detailed proposals in this regard. The Board again calls for the establishment of a National Contact Register to assist all those who seek to make contact. The media coverage surrounding the controversy in relation to children sent outside theen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherStationery Officeen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesP50659en_GB
dc.subjectADOPTIONen_GB
dc.subjectSTATISTICSen_GB
dc.titleReport of the Adoption Board 1996en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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