2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/247132
Title:
Oral health in Ireland
Authors:
Oral Health Services Research Centre; National University of Ireland Cork; Dental Health Foundation, Ireland
Publisher:
Department of Health and Children (DOHC)
Issue Date:
1999
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/247132
Language:
en
Description:
The publication of "Shaping a Healthier Future, A Strategy for Effective Health Care in the 1990's" by the Department of Health & Children in 1994 is rightly regarded as a major turning point in the development of health policies in the Republic of Ireland. One of the key elements of the strategy outlined in this publication is the orientation of the health services "towards a health promotion approach based on encouraging people to take responsibility for their own health and on providing the environmental support necessary to achieve this". In the subsequent Dental Action Plan, published In May 1994, the development of "oral health promotion and preventive programmes" was highlighted. Oral health promotion should follow the principles defined in the W.H .O. Ottawa Charter (1986) for health promotion generally which Include creating healthy public policy, creating supportive environments, strengthening community action, developing personal skills and re-orientation of dental services. The W.H.O. 1997 Jakarta Declaration, while re-endorsing the principles of the Ottawa Charter, identifies the need to break through traditional boundaries and for the creation of new partnerships for health between the different sectors at all levels of governance in societies. Health promotion is placed firmly at the centre of health development. As such, it is relevant for both developing and developed countries. The Jakarta Declaration identified five priorities for health promotion in the 21 st Century: • to promote social responsibility for health • to increase investments for health development • to consolidate and expand 'partnerships for health' • to increase community capacity and 'empower' the individual in matters of health • to secure an infrastructure for health promotion
Keywords:
ORAL HEALTH; DENTAL HEALTH

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOral Health Services Research Centreen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNational University of Ireland Corken_GB
dc.contributor.authorDental Health Foundation, Irelanden_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-05T09:10:55Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-05T09:10:55Z-
dc.date.issued1999-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/247132-
dc.descriptionThe publication of "Shaping a Healthier Future, A Strategy for Effective Health Care in the 1990's" by the Department of Health & Children in 1994 is rightly regarded as a major turning point in the development of health policies in the Republic of Ireland. One of the key elements of the strategy outlined in this publication is the orientation of the health services "towards a health promotion approach based on encouraging people to take responsibility for their own health and on providing the environmental support necessary to achieve this". In the subsequent Dental Action Plan, published In May 1994, the development of "oral health promotion and preventive programmes" was highlighted. Oral health promotion should follow the principles defined in the W.H .O. Ottawa Charter (1986) for health promotion generally which Include creating healthy public policy, creating supportive environments, strengthening community action, developing personal skills and re-orientation of dental services. The W.H.O. 1997 Jakarta Declaration, while re-endorsing the principles of the Ottawa Charter, identifies the need to break through traditional boundaries and for the creation of new partnerships for health between the different sectors at all levels of governance in societies. Health promotion is placed firmly at the centre of health development. As such, it is relevant for both developing and developed countries. The Jakarta Declaration identified five priorities for health promotion in the 21 st Century: • to promote social responsibility for health • to increase investments for health development • to consolidate and expand 'partnerships for health' • to increase community capacity and 'empower' the individual in matters of health • to secure an infrastructure for health promotionen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDepartment of Health and Children (DOHC)en_GB
dc.subjectORAL HEALTHen_GB
dc.subjectDENTAL HEALTHen_GB
dc.titleOral health in Irelanden_GB
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