Discussion document on the development of specialist services in Dublin hospitals

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/246575
Title:
Discussion document on the development of specialist services in Dublin hospitals
Authors:
Department of Health (DoH); Comhairle na n'Ospideal
Publisher:
Department of Health (DoH)
Issue Date:
Jan-1977
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/246575
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
On the 11th October 1974, the Government announced its decision on future hospital development in Dublin. It was decided that there would be six major acute hospitals in Dublin at the Mater, St. Vincent's, St. James's, James Connolly Memorial and the new hospitals at Beaumont and Newlands Cross. The announcement said that there would be discussions with the hospital interests concerned to decide on a programme for implementing the decision to develop these six. Arising out of these discussions it was agreed in June 1975 to set up a Joint Working Group comprising members of Comhairle na n'Qspideal and the Department of Health to examine the distribution of specialist services in the Dublin area. The task of the Working Group was to prepare a consultation document on the strategy which might be adopted for the development of specialist services in the six general hospital centres designated by the Government; the allocation of specialist units between the centres and the relationship of special hospitals to the general hospitals. Factual Information on existing services: The Working Group had at its disposal factual information on existing services in Dublin hospitals which formed the basic data for this study. This information was drawn from the records of the Department of Health and Comhairle na n'Ospideal. In addition, some of the hospitals submitted detailed memoranda which helped to elaborate on the information already available. Finally, some of the members of the Working Group themselves contributed from their own knowledge and experience as practising consultants in Dublin. The volume and complexity of the factual information available to the Working Group was such that it would not be practical to incorporate it in this document. It is clear from the information available that in a number of specialties there are too many units and that many of these are too small to be Viable. For example, at the moment an E.N.T. service is provided in hospitals in Dublin, 6 of them having less than 10 beds in the specialty or again, there are gynaecology beds in 15 hospitals, ranging in number from 4 to 56 beds.
Keywords:
HOSPITALS; STRATEGIC PLAN

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDepartment of Health (DoH)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorComhairle na n'Ospidealen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-02T14:05:06Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-02T14:05:06Z-
dc.date.issued1977-01-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/246575-
dc.descriptionOn the 11th October 1974, the Government announced its decision on future hospital development in Dublin. It was decided that there would be six major acute hospitals in Dublin at the Mater, St. Vincent's, St. James's, James Connolly Memorial and the new hospitals at Beaumont and Newlands Cross. The announcement said that there would be discussions with the hospital interests concerned to decide on a programme for implementing the decision to develop these six. Arising out of these discussions it was agreed in June 1975 to set up a Joint Working Group comprising members of Comhairle na n'Qspideal and the Department of Health to examine the distribution of specialist services in the Dublin area. The task of the Working Group was to prepare a consultation document on the strategy which might be adopted for the development of specialist services in the six general hospital centres designated by the Government; the allocation of specialist units between the centres and the relationship of special hospitals to the general hospitals. Factual Information on existing services: The Working Group had at its disposal factual information on existing services in Dublin hospitals which formed the basic data for this study. This information was drawn from the records of the Department of Health and Comhairle na n'Ospideal. In addition, some of the hospitals submitted detailed memoranda which helped to elaborate on the information already available. Finally, some of the members of the Working Group themselves contributed from their own knowledge and experience as practising consultants in Dublin. The volume and complexity of the factual information available to the Working Group was such that it would not be practical to incorporate it in this document. It is clear from the information available that in a number of specialties there are too many units and that many of these are too small to be Viable. For example, at the moment an E.N.T. service is provided in hospitals in Dublin, 6 of them having less than 10 beds in the specialty or again, there are gynaecology beds in 15 hospitals, ranging in number from 4 to 56 beds.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherDepartment of Health (DoH)en_GB
dc.subjectHOSPITALSen_GB
dc.subjectSTRATEGIC PLANen_GB
dc.titleDiscussion document on the development of specialist services in Dublin hospitalsen_GB
dc.typeReporten
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