The relationship between insight and neurological dysfunction in first-episode psychosis.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/246553
Title:
The relationship between insight and neurological dysfunction in first-episode psychosis.
Authors:
Hill, M; Crumlish, N; Whitty, P; Clarke, M; Browne, S; Gervin, M; Kinsella, A; Waddington, J L; Larkin, C; O'Callaghan, E
Affiliation:
Stanley Research Unit, Cluain Mhuire Family Centre, St John of God Adult Psychiatric Service, Dublin, Ireland.
Citation:
The relationship between insight and neurological dysfunction in first-episode psychosis. 2012, 27 (3):200-5 Eur. Psychiatry
Journal:
European psychiatry : the journal of the Association of European Psychiatrists
Issue Date:
Apr-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/246553
DOI:
10.1016/j.eurpsy.2011.01.002
PubMed ID:
21392944
Abstract:
Impaired insight is commonly seen in psychosis and some studies have proposed that is a biologically based deficit. Support for this view comes from the excess of neurological soft signs (NSS) observed in patients with psychoses and their neural correlates which demonstrate a degree of overlap with the regions of interest implicated in neuroimaging studies of insight. The aim was to examine the relationship between NSS and insight in a sample of 241 first-episode psychosis patients.; Total scores and subscale scores from three insight measures and two NSS scales were correlated in addition to factors representing overall insight and NSS which we created using principal component analysis.; There were only four significant associations when we controlled for symptoms. "Softer" condensed neurological evaluation (CNE) signs were associated with our overall insight factor (r = 0.19, P = 0.02), with total Birchwood (r = -0.24, P < 0.01), and the Birchwood subscales; recognition of mental illness (r = -0.24, P < 0.01) and need for treatment (r = -0.18, P = 0.02). Total neurological evaluation scale (NES) and recognition of the achieved effects of medication were also weakly correlated (r = 0.14, P = 0.04).; This study does not support a direct link between neurological dysfunction and insight in psychosis. Our understanding of insight as a concept remains in its infancy.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adolescent; Adult; Awareness; Female; Humans; Male; Neurologic Examination; Psychotic Disorders
ISSN:
1778-3585

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHill, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorCrumlish, Nen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWhitty, Pen_GB
dc.contributor.authorClarke, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorBrowne, Sen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGervin, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorKinsella, Aen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWaddington, J Len_GB
dc.contributor.authorLarkin, Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Callaghan, Een_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-02T11:24:25Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-02T11:24:25Z-
dc.date.issued2012-04-
dc.identifier.citationThe relationship between insight and neurological dysfunction in first-episode psychosis. 2012, 27 (3):200-5 Eur. Psychiatryen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1778-3585-
dc.identifier.pmid21392944-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.eurpsy.2011.01.002-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/246553-
dc.description.abstractImpaired insight is commonly seen in psychosis and some studies have proposed that is a biologically based deficit. Support for this view comes from the excess of neurological soft signs (NSS) observed in patients with psychoses and their neural correlates which demonstrate a degree of overlap with the regions of interest implicated in neuroimaging studies of insight. The aim was to examine the relationship between NSS and insight in a sample of 241 first-episode psychosis patients.-
dc.description.abstractTotal scores and subscale scores from three insight measures and two NSS scales were correlated in addition to factors representing overall insight and NSS which we created using principal component analysis.-
dc.description.abstractThere were only four significant associations when we controlled for symptoms. "Softer" condensed neurological evaluation (CNE) signs were associated with our overall insight factor (r = 0.19, P = 0.02), with total Birchwood (r = -0.24, P < 0.01), and the Birchwood subscales; recognition of mental illness (r = -0.24, P < 0.01) and need for treatment (r = -0.18, P = 0.02). Total neurological evaluation scale (NES) and recognition of the achieved effects of medication were also weakly correlated (r = 0.14, P = 0.04).-
dc.description.abstractThis study does not support a direct link between neurological dysfunction and insight in psychosis. Our understanding of insight as a concept remains in its infancy.-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to European psychiatry : the journal of the Association of European Psychiatristsen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshAwareness-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshNeurologic Examination-
dc.subject.meshPsychotic Disorders-
dc.titleThe relationship between insight and neurological dysfunction in first-episode psychosis.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentStanley Research Unit, Cluain Mhuire Family Centre, St John of God Adult Psychiatric Service, Dublin, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalEuropean psychiatry : the journal of the Association of European Psychiatristsen_GB

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