2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/246513
Title:
Managing for health gain: a question of attitude
Authors:
Kelly, Donal
Affiliation:
Health Services Resource Centre
Publisher:
Institute of Public Administration (IPA)
Issue Date:
Sep-1993
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/246513
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Health Gain has become an increasingly common phrase in the nineties among health care managers and planners. This brief paper focuses on the implications of this concept for the healthcare system, with particular reference to its implications for healthcare managers. The concept of health gain has been closely associated with the work of the Welsh Health Planning Forum. A key aspect of the Strategic Direction that has been adopted by the National Health Service in Wales is that it is health gain focussed: RNHS Wales seeks to add years to life through a reduction in premature death, and life to years through an improvement in well being for the patients and the population at large The Welsh approach acknowledges that the healthgain concept alone does not provide an adequate strategic direction for the health services, and that it must be supported by two other themes concurrently: the effective use of resources and a people-centred service. Doyle has provided a simple, clear definition of hea1th gain: -Health gain is a descriptive term to indicate that patients, users or consumers of care should receive an output from their care. The output should be either an improvement in health status or quality of life; that is the person receiving care should be better off after the intervention than they would have been if no service was received". In this definition, relative improvements in hea1th status are seen as constituting health gain i.e. there is a gain relative to what would have obtained without the intervention
Keywords:
HEALTH CARE; QUALITY OF LIFE
Series/Report no.:
HSRC; Paper 2/93

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Donalen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-02T08:32:06Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-02T08:32:06Z-
dc.date.issued1993-09-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/246513-
dc.descriptionHealth Gain has become an increasingly common phrase in the nineties among health care managers and planners. This brief paper focuses on the implications of this concept for the healthcare system, with particular reference to its implications for healthcare managers. The concept of health gain has been closely associated with the work of the Welsh Health Planning Forum. A key aspect of the Strategic Direction that has been adopted by the National Health Service in Wales is that it is health gain focussed: RNHS Wales seeks to add years to life through a reduction in premature death, and life to years through an improvement in well being for the patients and the population at large The Welsh approach acknowledges that the healthgain concept alone does not provide an adequate strategic direction for the health services, and that it must be supported by two other themes concurrently: the effective use of resources and a people-centred service. Doyle has provided a simple, clear definition of hea1th gain: -Health gain is a descriptive term to indicate that patients, users or consumers of care should receive an output from their care. The output should be either an improvement in health status or quality of life; that is the person receiving care should be better off after the intervention than they would have been if no service was received". In this definition, relative improvements in hea1th status are seen as constituting health gain i.e. there is a gain relative to what would have obtained without the interventionen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInstitute of Public Administration (IPA)en_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesHSRCen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseriesPaper 2/93en_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH CAREen_GB
dc.subjectQUALITY OF LIFEen_GB
dc.titleManaging for health gain: a question of attitudeen_GB
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentHealth Services Resource Centreen_GB
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