Diagnostic accuracy of the STRATIFY clinical prediction rule for falls: A systematic review and meta-analysis

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/246278
Title:
Diagnostic accuracy of the STRATIFY clinical prediction rule for falls: A systematic review and meta-analysis
Authors:
Billington, Jennifer; Fahey, Tom; Galvin, Rose
Citation:
BMC Family Practice. 2012 Aug 07;13(1):76
Issue Date:
7-Aug-2012
URI:
http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2296-13-76; http://hdl.handle.net/10147/246278
Abstract:
AbstractBackgroundThe STRATIFY score is a clinical prediction rule (CPR) derived to assist clinicians to identify patients at risk of falling. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to determine the overall diagnostic accuracy of the STRATIFY rule across a variety of clinical settings.MethodsA literature search was performed to identify all studies that validated the STRATIFY rule. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies tool. A STRATIFY score of ≥2 points was used to identify individuals at higher risk of falling. All included studies were combined using a bivariate random effects model to generate pooled sensitivity and specificity of STRATIFY at ≥2 points. Heterogeneity was assessed using the variance of logit transformed sensitivity and specificity.ResultsSeventeen studies were included in our meta-analysis, incorporating 11,378 patients. At a score ≥2 points, the STRATIFY rule is more useful at ruling out falls in those classified as low risk, with a greater pooled sensitivity estimate (0.67, 95% CI 0.52–0.80) than specificity (0.57, 95% CI 0.45 – 0.69). The sensitivity analysis which examined the performance of the rule in different settings and subgroups also showed broadly comparable results, indicating that the STRATIFY rule performs in a similar manner across a variety of different ‘at risk’ patient groups in different clinical settings.ConclusionThis systematic review shows that the diagnostic accuracy of the STRATIFY rule is limited and should not be used in isolation for identifying individuals at high risk of falls in clinical practice.
Item Type:
Journal Article

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBillington, Jennifer-
dc.contributor.authorFahey, Tom-
dc.contributor.authorGalvin, Rose-
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-28T15:33:09Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-28T15:33:09Z-
dc.date.issued2012-08-07-
dc.identifier.citationBMC Family Practice. 2012 Aug 07;13(1):76-
dc.identifier.urihttp://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2296-13-76-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/246278-
dc.description.abstractAbstractBackgroundThe STRATIFY score is a clinical prediction rule (CPR) derived to assist clinicians to identify patients at risk of falling. The purpose of this systematic review and meta-analysis is to determine the overall diagnostic accuracy of the STRATIFY rule across a variety of clinical settings.MethodsA literature search was performed to identify all studies that validated the STRATIFY rule. The methodological quality of the studies was assessed using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies tool. A STRATIFY score of ≥2 points was used to identify individuals at higher risk of falling. All included studies were combined using a bivariate random effects model to generate pooled sensitivity and specificity of STRATIFY at ≥2 points. Heterogeneity was assessed using the variance of logit transformed sensitivity and specificity.ResultsSeventeen studies were included in our meta-analysis, incorporating 11,378 patients. At a score ≥2 points, the STRATIFY rule is more useful at ruling out falls in those classified as low risk, with a greater pooled sensitivity estimate (0.67, 95% CI 0.52–0.80) than specificity (0.57, 95% CI 0.45 – 0.69). The sensitivity analysis which examined the performance of the rule in different settings and subgroups also showed broadly comparable results, indicating that the STRATIFY rule performs in a similar manner across a variety of different ‘at risk’ patient groups in different clinical settings.ConclusionThis systematic review shows that the diagnostic accuracy of the STRATIFY rule is limited and should not be used in isolation for identifying individuals at high risk of falls in clinical practice.-
dc.titleDiagnostic accuracy of the STRATIFY clinical prediction rule for falls: A systematic review and meta-analysis-
dc.typeJournal Article-
dc.language.rfc3066en-
dc.rights.holderJennifer Billington et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.-
dc.description.versionPeer Reviewed-
dc.date.updated2012-09-28T15:11:15Z-
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