An inconvenient truth: treatment of displaced paediatric supracondylar humeral fractures.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/245433
Title:
An inconvenient truth: treatment of displaced paediatric supracondylar humeral fractures.
Authors:
Donnelly, M; Green, C; Kelly, I P
Affiliation:
Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Waterford Regional Hospital, Dunmore road, Waterford, Ireland.
Citation:
An inconvenient truth: treatment of displaced paediatric supracondylar humeral fractures. 2012, 10 (3):143-7 Surgeon
Journal:
The surgeon : journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Ireland
Issue Date:
Jun-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/245433
DOI:
10.1016/j.surge.2011.03.002
PubMed ID:
22525415
Abstract:
The need for emergent management of displaced paediatric supracondylar humeral fractures is being questioned in the literature. Open reduction rates of up to 46% have been reported in the non-emergent management of these injuries. At our institution these fractures are managed as operative emergencies by senior personnel. To examine the ongoing need for this policy we reviewed our results. All patients managed over a five year period with Gartland type IIB or III paeditric supracondylar humeral fractures were identified and a comprehensive chart and radiographic review undertaken. The mean time from injury to fracture reduction and stabilization was 6.6 h. Consultants performed or supervised 90% of cases. Open reduction was necessary in 5% of cases. Complications included a perioperative nerve injury rate of 6% and a superficial pin site infection rate of 3%. This study suggests that, despite the challenge to trauma on-call rostering, the emergency management of these injuries is advantageous to patients in units of our size. Based on the data presented here we continue our practice of emergent management. We suggest that units of a similar size to our own would show a benefit from an analogous policy albeit an inconvenient truth.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Analysis of Variance; Bone Nails; Bone Wires; Chi-Square Distribution; Child; Child, Preschool; Cohort Studies; Dislocations; Elbow Joint; Emergency Treatment; Female; Fracture Fixation; Fracture Fixation, Internal; Humans; Humeral Fractures; Injury Severity Score; Length of Stay; Male; Pain Measurement; Prognosis; Range of Motion, Articular; Recovery of Function; Registries; Retrospective Studies; Risk Assessment; Time Factors; Treatment Outcome
ISSN:
1479-666X

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDonnelly, Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorGreen, Cen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKelly, I Pen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-21T09:33:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-21T09:33:43Z-
dc.date.issued2012-06-
dc.identifier.citationAn inconvenient truth: treatment of displaced paediatric supracondylar humeral fractures. 2012, 10 (3):143-7 Surgeonen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1479-666X-
dc.identifier.pmid22525415-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.surge.2011.03.002-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/245433-
dc.description.abstractThe need for emergent management of displaced paediatric supracondylar humeral fractures is being questioned in the literature. Open reduction rates of up to 46% have been reported in the non-emergent management of these injuries. At our institution these fractures are managed as operative emergencies by senior personnel. To examine the ongoing need for this policy we reviewed our results. All patients managed over a five year period with Gartland type IIB or III paeditric supracondylar humeral fractures were identified and a comprehensive chart and radiographic review undertaken. The mean time from injury to fracture reduction and stabilization was 6.6 h. Consultants performed or supervised 90% of cases. Open reduction was necessary in 5% of cases. Complications included a perioperative nerve injury rate of 6% and a superficial pin site infection rate of 3%. This study suggests that, despite the challenge to trauma on-call rostering, the emergency management of these injuries is advantageous to patients in units of our size. Based on the data presented here we continue our practice of emergent management. We suggest that units of a similar size to our own would show a benefit from an analogous policy albeit an inconvenient truth.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The surgeon : journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Irelanden_GB
dc.subject.meshAnalysis of Variance-
dc.subject.meshBone Nails-
dc.subject.meshBone Wires-
dc.subject.meshChi-Square Distribution-
dc.subject.meshChild-
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschool-
dc.subject.meshCohort Studies-
dc.subject.meshDislocations-
dc.subject.meshElbow Joint-
dc.subject.meshEmergency Treatment-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshFracture Fixation-
dc.subject.meshFracture Fixation, Internal-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshHumeral Fractures-
dc.subject.meshInjury Severity Score-
dc.subject.meshLength of Stay-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshPain Measurement-
dc.subject.meshPrognosis-
dc.subject.meshRange of Motion, Articular-
dc.subject.meshRecovery of Function-
dc.subject.meshRegistries-
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies-
dc.subject.meshRisk Assessment-
dc.subject.meshTime Factors-
dc.subject.meshTreatment Outcome-
dc.titleAn inconvenient truth: treatment of displaced paediatric supracondylar humeral fractures.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Orthopaedic Surgery, Waterford Regional Hospital, Dunmore road, Waterford, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalThe surgeon : journal of the Royal Colleges of Surgeons of Edinburgh and Irelanden_GB
dc.description.provinceMunsteren

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