2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/245432
Title:
A handbook for research in general practice
Authors:
Comber, Harry; Irish College of General Practitioners. Education and Research Committee
Publisher:
Irish College of General Practitioners (ICGP)
Issue Date:
Feb-1986
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/245432
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Why do research? Medical students and doctors in training are asked to accept two incompatible view. of medicine - firstly, that it is a scientific discipline based on objective research, and secondly, that everything which they are taught is true and not to be questioned. In the environment of examinations and career competition, the second view tends to gain precedence, and only occasionally does the young doctor glimpse the very shaky foundations on which 'scientific medicine' is actually based. As a practicing general practitioner, however, he soon discovers facts that conflict with the 'facts' which he swallowed whole in medical school; he discovers that what he has learned is one part fact to every ten parts of educated guesswork; and that there are very few definite answers to the questions which arise in his daily work. For most of us then, our practice is mainly a matter of trial and error.
Keywords:
GENERAL PRACTICE; EDUCATION; RESEARCH

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorComber, Harryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorIrish College of General Practitioners. Education and Research Committeeen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-21T09:26:29Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-21T09:26:29Z-
dc.date.issued1986-02-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/245432-
dc.descriptionWhy do research? Medical students and doctors in training are asked to accept two incompatible view. of medicine - firstly, that it is a scientific discipline based on objective research, and secondly, that everything which they are taught is true and not to be questioned. In the environment of examinations and career competition, the second view tends to gain precedence, and only occasionally does the young doctor glimpse the very shaky foundations on which 'scientific medicine' is actually based. As a practicing general practitioner, however, he soon discovers facts that conflict with the 'facts' which he swallowed whole in medical school; he discovers that what he has learned is one part fact to every ten parts of educated guesswork; and that there are very few definite answers to the questions which arise in his daily work. For most of us then, our practice is mainly a matter of trial and error.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIrish College of General Practitioners (ICGP)en_GB
dc.subjectGENERAL PRACTICEen_GB
dc.subjectEDUCATIONen_GB
dc.subjectRESEARCHen_GB
dc.titleA handbook for research in general practiceen_GB
dc.typeReporten
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