Infant feeding in Ireland: current practice and recommendations

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/245152
Title:
Infant feeding in Ireland: current practice and recommendations
Authors:
Freeman, Valerie; Hoey, Hilary; Gibney, Michael; Trinity College Dublin. Department of Paediatrics; Trinity College Dublin. Department of Nutrition
Publisher:
Trinity College Dublin
Issue Date:
1995
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/245152
Item Type:
Working Paper
Language:
en
Description:
The importance of infant feeding cannot be over-emphasised. Recent findings relate early nutritional experience not only to infant morbidity but to the development of cardia-vascular disease in later life. A major research project is in progress in Europe to investigate infant feeding practices and micro-nutrient status and to monitor growth in a sample of normal healthy children. The study is part of a pan-European initiative involving about 2000 infants in 21 European centres. In Ireland the project is co-ordinated by the Depanments of Clinical Medicine and Paediatrics at Trinity College, Dublin, and is generously funded by Cow & Gate Nutricia, Ireland Ltd. This is the first comprehensive longitudinal Irish study to follow infant feeding practices and growth in a mixed socio-economic group of normal, healthy infants from birth. In lreland 121 infants were recruited in 1992 and followed longitudinally to date. Results give detailed information about feeding practices from birth, the incidence and duration of breast-feeding, the variety of formula milks consumed, the age of introduction of solids and the types of foods used. The iron status of ninety-two infants was assessed at age 12 months. This paper the results to age 12 months, highlighting some of the issues which have implications for the formulation of infant feeding policy in Ireland. • Breast-feeding • Formula feeding • The use of cow' s milk in infancy • Weaning • iron status
Keywords:
INFANT NUTRITION; INFANT FEEDING

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFreeman, Valerieen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHoey, Hilaryen_GB
dc.contributor.authorGibney, Michaelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTrinity College Dublin. Department of Paediatricsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTrinity College Dublin. Department of Nutritionen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-20T08:11:51Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-20T08:11:51Z-
dc.date.issued1995-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/245152-
dc.descriptionThe importance of infant feeding cannot be over-emphasised. Recent findings relate early nutritional experience not only to infant morbidity but to the development of cardia-vascular disease in later life. A major research project is in progress in Europe to investigate infant feeding practices and micro-nutrient status and to monitor growth in a sample of normal healthy children. The study is part of a pan-European initiative involving about 2000 infants in 21 European centres. In Ireland the project is co-ordinated by the Depanments of Clinical Medicine and Paediatrics at Trinity College, Dublin, and is generously funded by Cow & Gate Nutricia, Ireland Ltd. This is the first comprehensive longitudinal Irish study to follow infant feeding practices and growth in a mixed socio-economic group of normal, healthy infants from birth. In lreland 121 infants were recruited in 1992 and followed longitudinally to date. Results give detailed information about feeding practices from birth, the incidence and duration of breast-feeding, the variety of formula milks consumed, the age of introduction of solids and the types of foods used. The iron status of ninety-two infants was assessed at age 12 months. This paper the results to age 12 months, highlighting some of the issues which have implications for the formulation of infant feeding policy in Ireland. • Breast-feeding • Formula feeding • The use of cow' s milk in infancy • Weaning • iron statusen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTrinity College Dublinen_GB
dc.subjectINFANT NUTRITIONen_GB
dc.subjectINFANT FEEDINGen_GB
dc.titleInfant feeding in Ireland: current practice and recommendationsen_GB
dc.typeWorking Paperen
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