Growing up in Ireland: national longitudinal study of children - how families matter for social and emotional outcomes of 9-year-old children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/244583
Title:
Growing up in Ireland: national longitudinal study of children - how families matter for social and emotional outcomes of 9-year-old children
Authors:
Nixon, Elizabeth; Department of Children and Youth Affairs
Affiliation:
Trinity College Dublin
Publisher:
Government Publications
Issue Date:
2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/244583
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
This report is concerned with how families matter for the social and emotional outcomes of nine-year-olds in the Growing Up in Ireland study. The analysis considers how these outcomes relate to the characteristics of both the child and the child’s family. Data were collected from teachers and mothers on children’s social, emotional and behavioural problems using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Data on child characteristics, the quality of the parent-child relationship, parental depression, and marital satisfaction were gathered from mothers and fathers, while children reported on mothers’ and fathers’ parenting styles. Data on family structure and income levels were also included in the analysis. The findings presented are based on tests of associations among variables and interpretation requires caution about inferring causality to these relationships.
Keywords:
CHILD WELFARE; FAMILY
ISBN:
9781406426465
Sponsors:
ERSI, TCD

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNixon, Elizabethen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDepartment of Children and Youth Affairsen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-18T11:40:57Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-18T11:40:57Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.isbn9781406426465-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/244583-
dc.descriptionThis report is concerned with how families matter for the social and emotional outcomes of nine-year-olds in the Growing Up in Ireland study. The analysis considers how these outcomes relate to the characteristics of both the child and the child’s family. Data were collected from teachers and mothers on children’s social, emotional and behavioural problems using the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ). Data on child characteristics, the quality of the parent-child relationship, parental depression, and marital satisfaction were gathered from mothers and fathers, while children reported on mothers’ and fathers’ parenting styles. Data on family structure and income levels were also included in the analysis. The findings presented are based on tests of associations among variables and interpretation requires caution about inferring causality to these relationships.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipERSI, TCDen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGovernment Publicationsen_GB
dc.subjectCHILD WELFAREen_GB
dc.subjectFAMILYen_GB
dc.titleGrowing up in Ireland: national longitudinal study of children - how families matter for social and emotional outcomes of 9-year-old childrenen_GB
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentTrinity College Dublinen_GB
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