2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/244354
Title:
Reports of side effects associated with the use of drugs 1985
Authors:
National Drugs Advisory Board (NDAB)
Publisher:
National Drugs Advisory Board (NDAB)
Issue Date:
1985
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/244354
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Halothane In the ten year period of 1970 to 1980 the Board received 9 reports of hepatitis (2 fatal) associated with the repeated use of halothane. This mirrors experience in other countries. Although the mechanism of action is not as yet generally accepted, the role of allergenicity is considered highly significant. It is recommended that where ever possible administration of halothane should not be repeated at less than 3 monthly Intervals. A second potential source of risk from halothane lies in its cardiodepressant action, a tendency to bradycardia, and to arrhythmias which may lead to particular problems when the anaesthetic is administered to patients maintained on beta-adrenoceptor blockade. It Is essential that anaesthetists be aware of medications used on patients coming under their cam so that appropriate precaution can be taken. 2. Carbamazepine This drug Is being used more frequently in the management not only of epilepsy but for other conditions. It is useful therefore to review the types of side effects for which clinicians need to be on the alert. The most Important of these concern the central nervous system with incoordination, drowsiness and ataxia, hypersensitivity reactions affecting skin, liver, blood and lung particularly, and those apparently directly related to plasma levels of carbamazepine such as the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. 3. Glutethimide This drug was withdrawn from the market in 1983. As has been reported in other countries its use has been associated with cases of dependence. 4. Phenothiazineu The Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome characterised by hyperthermia, semi coma to coma, muscular rigidity and autonomic disorders is generally recognised as being most frequently associated with the high potency anti psychotic drugs such as chlorpromazine, flupenthixol and trifluoperazine. It is less commonly known that a similar adverse effect can develop with prolonged antihistamine therapy especially with the phenothiazines, but also with some of the other antihistamines. Recovery is delayed with those drugs having a long half life or presented as a dep6t preparation. The reaction can be particularly severe in the young. 5. Benzodiazepines It is again noteworthy that central nervous system irritability manifested as confusion, bizzare behaviour, nightmares, hallucinations, aggression, and occasionally withdrawal syndrome, etc. occurs In some individuals in association with drugs of this group particularly those with a short half-life, when used over prolonged periods, in association with other centrally active drugs, or in the elderly. It is important tl1at use of benzodiazepines should be limited to short periods of 4 to 6 weeks or less, whether the drug is intended for Insomnia or anxiety, kept to as low a dose as possible if given concomitantly with other central nervous system drugs, and used at minimal levels for the elderly. 6. Midazolam This short acting benzodiazepine has been available for about 18 months as a parenterally administered anaesthetic for short duration minor procedures. Particular care is required in its rate of administration and in the selection of patients for its use since It has a significant propensity for cardiorespiratory functional depression
Keywords:
MEDICINES; ADVERSE EVENTS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNational Drugs Advisory Board (NDAB)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-17T15:00:10Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-17T15:00:10Z-
dc.date.issued1985-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/244354-
dc.descriptionHalothane In the ten year period of 1970 to 1980 the Board received 9 reports of hepatitis (2 fatal) associated with the repeated use of halothane. This mirrors experience in other countries. Although the mechanism of action is not as yet generally accepted, the role of allergenicity is considered highly significant. It is recommended that where ever possible administration of halothane should not be repeated at less than 3 monthly Intervals. A second potential source of risk from halothane lies in its cardiodepressant action, a tendency to bradycardia, and to arrhythmias which may lead to particular problems when the anaesthetic is administered to patients maintained on beta-adrenoceptor blockade. It Is essential that anaesthetists be aware of medications used on patients coming under their cam so that appropriate precaution can be taken. 2. Carbamazepine This drug Is being used more frequently in the management not only of epilepsy but for other conditions. It is useful therefore to review the types of side effects for which clinicians need to be on the alert. The most Important of these concern the central nervous system with incoordination, drowsiness and ataxia, hypersensitivity reactions affecting skin, liver, blood and lung particularly, and those apparently directly related to plasma levels of carbamazepine such as the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone. 3. Glutethimide This drug was withdrawn from the market in 1983. As has been reported in other countries its use has been associated with cases of dependence. 4. Phenothiazineu The Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome characterised by hyperthermia, semi coma to coma, muscular rigidity and autonomic disorders is generally recognised as being most frequently associated with the high potency anti psychotic drugs such as chlorpromazine, flupenthixol and trifluoperazine. It is less commonly known that a similar adverse effect can develop with prolonged antihistamine therapy especially with the phenothiazines, but also with some of the other antihistamines. Recovery is delayed with those drugs having a long half life or presented as a dep6t preparation. The reaction can be particularly severe in the young. 5. Benzodiazepines It is again noteworthy that central nervous system irritability manifested as confusion, bizzare behaviour, nightmares, hallucinations, aggression, and occasionally withdrawal syndrome, etc. occurs In some individuals in association with drugs of this group particularly those with a short half-life, when used over prolonged periods, in association with other centrally active drugs, or in the elderly. It is important tl1at use of benzodiazepines should be limited to short periods of 4 to 6 weeks or less, whether the drug is intended for Insomnia or anxiety, kept to as low a dose as possible if given concomitantly with other central nervous system drugs, and used at minimal levels for the elderly. 6. Midazolam This short acting benzodiazepine has been available for about 18 months as a parenterally administered anaesthetic for short duration minor procedures. Particular care is required in its rate of administration and in the selection of patients for its use since It has a significant propensity for cardiorespiratory functional depressionen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNational Drugs Advisory Board (NDAB)en_GB
dc.subjectMEDICINESen_GB
dc.subjectADVERSE EVENTSen_GB
dc.titleReports of side effects associated with the use of drugs 1985en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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