Ana Liffey Drug Project annual report 1993

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/244337
Title:
Ana Liffey Drug Project annual report 1993
Authors:
Ana Liffey Drug Project
Publisher:
Ana Liffey Drug Project
Issue Date:
1994
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/244337
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
I note that the Project commenced in 1982 and since that time the range and level of services has been developed significantly. The Project was established at a time when the need for services for people with HIV/AIDS had not become apparent and it is a wonderful tribute to the in initiative and talent of the people concerned that they managed to develop services to cope with the new demands placed on it not only by the problem of drug misuse but by the spread of HIV/AIDS. I would like to turn to some of the issues raised in the 1993 Annual Report. [note that 739 people attended the Project during 1993 and that this represents an increase of 10% in the numbers attending in 1992. Significant increases were also reported in other areas such as counselling and intervention. It is worth noting also that from 1990 to 1993 the number of persons attending increased from 445 to 739. This is a very strong indication of the relevance of the services provided by the Project for drug users and their families and that the Project has established itself as an important point of contact in their lives. I note also that several new services were initiated during 1993 including a new training initiative aimed at preparing clients of the Project for integration into mainstream training projects for the unemployed. I know that there was some uncertainty about the Project becoming involved in such an enterprise but I am pleased to see that, having completed two training courses, it is now accepted by all concerned that this was a very worthwhile and rewarding experience for the Project. What was perhaps more important of course was that from the clients' point of view it was eminently successful. I would like to take this opportunity to wish the Project well with the further development of this training programme and I look forward to hearing more about it in the future. Training programmes such as this must have a place in our overall strategies since they offer the drug misuser hope for reintegration into the mainstream of daily living. 3 The illicit use of drugs continues 10 be a serious public health and social problem and it is recognised internationally that there is no single solution. What is needed is a combination of approaches. To this end my Department will continue to use the Government Strategy to prevent Drug Misuse which was drawn up by the National Co-ordinating Committee on Drug Abuse as the basis for our response. This will include preventive programmes, public information campaigns, increased detoxification and rehabilitation facilities, the involvement of general practitioners at community level and the provision of additional satellite clinics in the greater Dublin area to provide services for drug misusers. Voluntary organisations will have a vital role 10 play in the implementation of the strategy and indeed r would like to take this opportunity to express my appreciation of the work of the organisations in the drug misuse and HIV/AIDS area. It wilt be important that the voluntary and statutory agencies continue to work hand-in-hand if we are to cope with the threat posed by drug misuse and HIV/AIDS. The suffering and hardships endured by individuals arising from drug misuse must never be forgotten and we must all continue in our efforts to do whatever is necessary to create the conditions which will provide relief for those who are unfortunate to be caught up in the cycle of drug misuse. This is where organisations such as Ana Liffey come into their own. In recent years the Government has provided substantial funding for the development of services for drug misusers and the associated problem of HIV/AIDS. My Department was glad to be able to provide funding through the Eastern Health Board for the Project over the past couple of years. I know that the demands placed on organisations such as Ana Liffey continue to grow and I am committed to continue seeking additional funding in coming years which will allow for the further development of services in this area. I would like to thank once again the Chairman Joe O'Rourke, the Director Marguerite Woods and all the staff of the Project for your kind invitation to me to be with you this afternoon and I have pleasure in accepting the 1993 Annual Report. I would like to conclude by wishing the Ana Liffey Drug Project every success in the future. Foreword In 1993, once again, there was an increase in the numbers attending and in the numbers of counselling sessions provided in the Project. While an increase inevitably imposes further strain on our small staff, it also indicates that the service we provide in the Project continues to prove attractive to those who are trying to kick the drug habit and gel back to being involved in a more regular and effective lifestyle. The drop in centre in lower Abbey Street provides a friendly environment in which an individual trying 10 come to terms with a drug problem may receive informed advice and assistance from a staff skilled in coping with the many problems which drug use throws up. From the start of the Project the drop in centre has been its core feature and we hope 10 continue to improve the service provided there in the current year. We continued in 1993 to provide a support service for the families of drug users who found it difficult to cope with problems created for them by the drug using member of their family. We also continued 10 resource the le Cheile group which supports parents of adults who acquired HIV infection as a result of intravenous drug use. A new activity was inaugurated when the HORIZON programme commenced in mid 1993. Aimed at facilitating former drug users to become more capable of coping with the stresses involved in accessing
Keywords:
DRUGS MISUSE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAna Liffey Drug Projecten_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-17T15:18:43Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-17T15:18:43Z-
dc.date.issued1994-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/244337-
dc.descriptionI note that the Project commenced in 1982 and since that time the range and level of services has been developed significantly. The Project was established at a time when the need for services for people with HIV/AIDS had not become apparent and it is a wonderful tribute to the in initiative and talent of the people concerned that they managed to develop services to cope with the new demands placed on it not only by the problem of drug misuse but by the spread of HIV/AIDS. I would like to turn to some of the issues raised in the 1993 Annual Report. [note that 739 people attended the Project during 1993 and that this represents an increase of 10% in the numbers attending in 1992. Significant increases were also reported in other areas such as counselling and intervention. It is worth noting also that from 1990 to 1993 the number of persons attending increased from 445 to 739. This is a very strong indication of the relevance of the services provided by the Project for drug users and their families and that the Project has established itself as an important point of contact in their lives. I note also that several new services were initiated during 1993 including a new training initiative aimed at preparing clients of the Project for integration into mainstream training projects for the unemployed. I know that there was some uncertainty about the Project becoming involved in such an enterprise but I am pleased to see that, having completed two training courses, it is now accepted by all concerned that this was a very worthwhile and rewarding experience for the Project. What was perhaps more important of course was that from the clients' point of view it was eminently successful. I would like to take this opportunity to wish the Project well with the further development of this training programme and I look forward to hearing more about it in the future. Training programmes such as this must have a place in our overall strategies since they offer the drug misuser hope for reintegration into the mainstream of daily living. 3 The illicit use of drugs continues 10 be a serious public health and social problem and it is recognised internationally that there is no single solution. What is needed is a combination of approaches. To this end my Department will continue to use the Government Strategy to prevent Drug Misuse which was drawn up by the National Co-ordinating Committee on Drug Abuse as the basis for our response. This will include preventive programmes, public information campaigns, increased detoxification and rehabilitation facilities, the involvement of general practitioners at community level and the provision of additional satellite clinics in the greater Dublin area to provide services for drug misusers. Voluntary organisations will have a vital role 10 play in the implementation of the strategy and indeed r would like to take this opportunity to express my appreciation of the work of the organisations in the drug misuse and HIV/AIDS area. It wilt be important that the voluntary and statutory agencies continue to work hand-in-hand if we are to cope with the threat posed by drug misuse and HIV/AIDS. The suffering and hardships endured by individuals arising from drug misuse must never be forgotten and we must all continue in our efforts to do whatever is necessary to create the conditions which will provide relief for those who are unfortunate to be caught up in the cycle of drug misuse. This is where organisations such as Ana Liffey come into their own. In recent years the Government has provided substantial funding for the development of services for drug misusers and the associated problem of HIV/AIDS. My Department was glad to be able to provide funding through the Eastern Health Board for the Project over the past couple of years. I know that the demands placed on organisations such as Ana Liffey continue to grow and I am committed to continue seeking additional funding in coming years which will allow for the further development of services in this area. I would like to thank once again the Chairman Joe O'Rourke, the Director Marguerite Woods and all the staff of the Project for your kind invitation to me to be with you this afternoon and I have pleasure in accepting the 1993 Annual Report. I would like to conclude by wishing the Ana Liffey Drug Project every success in the future. Foreword In 1993, once again, there was an increase in the numbers attending and in the numbers of counselling sessions provided in the Project. While an increase inevitably imposes further strain on our small staff, it also indicates that the service we provide in the Project continues to prove attractive to those who are trying to kick the drug habit and gel back to being involved in a more regular and effective lifestyle. The drop in centre in lower Abbey Street provides a friendly environment in which an individual trying 10 come to terms with a drug problem may receive informed advice and assistance from a staff skilled in coping with the many problems which drug use throws up. From the start of the Project the drop in centre has been its core feature and we hope 10 continue to improve the service provided there in the current year. We continued in 1993 to provide a support service for the families of drug users who found it difficult to cope with problems created for them by the drug using member of their family. We also continued 10 resource the le Cheile group which supports parents of adults who acquired HIV infection as a result of intravenous drug use. A new activity was inaugurated when the HORIZON programme commenced in mid 1993. Aimed at facilitating former drug users to become more capable of coping with the stresses involved in accessingen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAna Liffey Drug Projecten_GB
dc.subjectDRUGS MISUSE-
dc.titleAna Liffey Drug Project annual report 1993en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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