Shared care between specialised psychiatric services and primary care: The experiences and expectations of General Practitioners in Ireland.

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/244232
Title:
Shared care between specialised psychiatric services and primary care: The experiences and expectations of General Practitioners in Ireland.
Authors:
Agyapong, Vincent Israel Opoku; Jabbar, Faiza; Conway, Catherine
Affiliation:
Department of Psychiatry, University of Dublin Trinity College.
Citation:
Shared care between specialised psychiatric services and primary care: The experiences and expectations of General Practitioners in Ireland. 2012:notInt J Psychiatry Clin Pract
Journal:
International journal of psychiatry in clinical practice
Issue Date:
17-Apr-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/244232
DOI:
10.3109/13651501.2012.667115
PubMed ID:
22509780
Abstract:
Objective. The study aims to explore the views of General Practitioners in Ireland on shared care between specialised psychiatric services and primary care. Method. A self-administered questionnaire was designed and posted to 400 randomly selected General Practitioners working in Ireland. Results. Of the respondents, 189 (94%) reported that they would support a general policy on shared care between primary care and specialised psychiatric services for patients who are stable on their treatment. However, 124 (61.4%) reported that they foresaw difficulties for patients in implementing such a policy including: a concern that primary care is not adequately resourced with allied health professionals to support provision of psychiatric care (113, 53.2%); a concern this would result in increased financial burden on some patients (89, 48.8%); a lack of adequate cooperation between primary care and specialised mental health services (84, 41.8%); a concern that some patients may lack confidence in GP care (55, 27.4%); and that primary care providers are not adequately trained to provide psychiatric care (29, 14.4% ). Conclusion. The majority of GPs in Ireland would support a policy of shared care of psychiatric patients; however they raise significant concerns regarding practical implications of such a policy in Ireland.
Item Type:
Article In Press
Language:
en
ISSN:
1471-1788

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAgyapong, Vincent Israel Opokuen_GB
dc.contributor.authorJabbar, Faizaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorConway, Catherineen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-17T09:06:34Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-17T09:06:34Z-
dc.date.issued2012-04-17-
dc.identifier.citationShared care between specialised psychiatric services and primary care: The experiences and expectations of General Practitioners in Ireland. 2012:notInt J Psychiatry Clin Practen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1471-1788-
dc.identifier.pmid22509780-
dc.identifier.doi10.3109/13651501.2012.667115-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/244232-
dc.description.abstractObjective. The study aims to explore the views of General Practitioners in Ireland on shared care between specialised psychiatric services and primary care. Method. A self-administered questionnaire was designed and posted to 400 randomly selected General Practitioners working in Ireland. Results. Of the respondents, 189 (94%) reported that they would support a general policy on shared care between primary care and specialised psychiatric services for patients who are stable on their treatment. However, 124 (61.4%) reported that they foresaw difficulties for patients in implementing such a policy including: a concern that primary care is not adequately resourced with allied health professionals to support provision of psychiatric care (113, 53.2%); a concern this would result in increased financial burden on some patients (89, 48.8%); a lack of adequate cooperation between primary care and specialised mental health services (84, 41.8%); a concern that some patients may lack confidence in GP care (55, 27.4%); and that primary care providers are not adequately trained to provide psychiatric care (29, 14.4% ). Conclusion. The majority of GPs in Ireland would support a policy of shared care of psychiatric patients; however they raise significant concerns regarding practical implications of such a policy in Ireland.en_GB
dc.languageENG-
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to International journal of psychiatry in clinical practiceen_GB
dc.titleShared care between specialised psychiatric services and primary care: The experiences and expectations of General Practitioners in Ireland.en_GB
dc.typeArticle In Pressen
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Psychiatry, University of Dublin Trinity College.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalInternational journal of psychiatry in clinical practiceen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren

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