Long-term maternal recall of obstetric complications in schizophrenia research.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/244227
Title:
Long-term maternal recall of obstetric complications in schizophrenia research.
Authors:
Walshe, Muriel; McDonald, Colm; Boydell, Jane; Zhao, Jing Hua; Kravariti, Eugenia; Touloupoulou, Timothea; Fearon, Paul; Bramon, Elvira; Murray, Robin M; Allin, Matthew
Affiliation:
King's College London, King's Health Partners, Institute of Psychiatry, Department of Psychosis Studies and NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, London, SE5 8AF, UK. muriel.walshe@kcl.ac.uk
Citation:
Long-term maternal recall of obstetric complications in schizophrenia research. 2011, 187 (3):335-40 Psychiatry Res
Journal:
Psychiatry research
Issue Date:
30-May-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/244227
DOI:
10.1016/j.psychres.2011.01.013
PubMed ID:
21324530
Abstract:
Obstetric complications (OCs) are consistently implicated in the aetiology of schizophrenia. Information about OCs is often gathered retrospectively, from maternal interview. It has been suggested that mothers of people with schizophrenia may not be accurate in their recollection of obstetric events. We assessed the validity of long term maternal recall by comparing maternal ratings of OCs with those obtained from medical records in a sample of mothers of offspring affected and unaffected with psychotic illness. Obstetric records were retrieved for 30 subjects affected with psychosis and 40 of their unaffected relatives. The Lewis-Murray scale of OCs was completed by maternal interview for each subject blind to the obstetric records. There was substantial agreement between maternal recall and birth records for the summary score of "definite" OCs, birth weight, and most of the individual items rated, with the exception of antepartum haemorrhage. There were no significant differences in the validity of recall or in errors of commission by mothers for affected and unaffected offspring. These findings indicate that several complications of pregnancy and delivery are accurately recalled by mother's decades after they occurred. Furthermore, there is no indication that mothers are less accurate in recalling OCs for their affected offspring than their unaffected offspring. When comparing women with and without recall errors, we found those with recall errors to have significantly worse verbal memory than women without such errors. Assessing the cognition of participants in retrospective studies may allow future studies to increase the reliability of their data.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
MeSH:
Adolescent; Adult; Birth Certificates; Female; Hospital Restructuring; Humans; Male; Memory Disorders; Mental Recall; Middle Aged; Neuropsychological Tests; Obstetric Labor Complications; Pregnancy; Reproducibility of Results; Retrospective Studies; Schizophrenia; Young Adult
ISSN:
0165-1781

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWalshe, Murielen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Colmen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBoydell, Janeen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZhao, Jing Huaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKravariti, Eugeniaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTouloupoulou, Timotheaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorFearon, Paulen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBramon, Elviraen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Robin Men_GB
dc.contributor.authorAllin, Matthewen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-17T09:05:52Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-17T09:05:52Z-
dc.date.issued2011-05-30-
dc.identifier.citationLong-term maternal recall of obstetric complications in schizophrenia research. 2011, 187 (3):335-40 Psychiatry Resen_GB
dc.identifier.issn0165-1781-
dc.identifier.pmid21324530-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.psychres.2011.01.013-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/244227-
dc.description.abstractObstetric complications (OCs) are consistently implicated in the aetiology of schizophrenia. Information about OCs is often gathered retrospectively, from maternal interview. It has been suggested that mothers of people with schizophrenia may not be accurate in their recollection of obstetric events. We assessed the validity of long term maternal recall by comparing maternal ratings of OCs with those obtained from medical records in a sample of mothers of offspring affected and unaffected with psychotic illness. Obstetric records were retrieved for 30 subjects affected with psychosis and 40 of their unaffected relatives. The Lewis-Murray scale of OCs was completed by maternal interview for each subject blind to the obstetric records. There was substantial agreement between maternal recall and birth records for the summary score of "definite" OCs, birth weight, and most of the individual items rated, with the exception of antepartum haemorrhage. There were no significant differences in the validity of recall or in errors of commission by mothers for affected and unaffected offspring. These findings indicate that several complications of pregnancy and delivery are accurately recalled by mother's decades after they occurred. Furthermore, there is no indication that mothers are less accurate in recalling OCs for their affected offspring than their unaffected offspring. When comparing women with and without recall errors, we found those with recall errors to have significantly worse verbal memory than women without such errors. Assessing the cognition of participants in retrospective studies may allow future studies to increase the reliability of their data.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Psychiatry researchen_GB
dc.subject.meshAdolescent-
dc.subject.meshAdult-
dc.subject.meshBirth Certificates-
dc.subject.meshFemale-
dc.subject.meshHospital Restructuring-
dc.subject.meshHumans-
dc.subject.meshMale-
dc.subject.meshMemory Disorders-
dc.subject.meshMental Recall-
dc.subject.meshMiddle Aged-
dc.subject.meshNeuropsychological Tests-
dc.subject.meshObstetric Labor Complications-
dc.subject.meshPregnancy-
dc.subject.meshReproducibility of Results-
dc.subject.meshRetrospective Studies-
dc.subject.meshSchizophrenia-
dc.subject.meshYoung Adult-
dc.titleLong-term maternal recall of obstetric complications in schizophrenia research.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentKing's College London, King's Health Partners, Institute of Psychiatry, Department of Psychosis Studies and NIHR Biomedical Research Centre, London, SE5 8AF, UK. muriel.walshe@kcl.ac.uken_GB
dc.identifier.journalPsychiatry researchen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren

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