A comparison of brief pulse and ultrabrief pulse electroconvulsive stimulation on rodent brain and behaviour.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/244216
Title:
A comparison of brief pulse and ultrabrief pulse electroconvulsive stimulation on rodent brain and behaviour.
Authors:
O'Donovan, Sinead; Kennedy, Mark; Guinan, Blaithin; O'Mara, Shane; McLoughlin, Declan M
Affiliation:
Trinity College Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland.
Citation:
A comparison of brief pulse and ultrabrief pulse electroconvulsive stimulation on rodent brain and behaviour. 2012, 37 (1):147-52 Prog. Neuropsychopharmacol. Biol. Psychiatry
Journal:
Progress in neuro-psychopharmacology & biological psychiatry
Issue Date:
27-Apr-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/244216
DOI:
10.1016/j.pnpbp.2011.12.012
PubMed ID:
22230649
Abstract:
Brief pulse electroconvulsive therapy (BP ECT; pulse width 0.5-1.5ms) is a very effective treatment for severe depression but is associated with cognitive side-effects. It has been proposed that ultrabrief pulse (UBP; pulse width 0.25-0.30ms) ECT may be as effective as BP ECT but have less cognitive effects because it is a more physiological form of neuronal stimulation. To investigate this further, we treated normal rats with a 10 session course of either BP (0.5ms), UBP (0.3ms), or sham electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) and measured antidepressant-related changes in dentate gyrus cell proliferation and hippocampal BDNF protein levels as well as hippocampal-dependant spatial reference memory using the water plus maze and immobility time on the forced swim test. Both BP and UBP ECS induced very similar types of motor seizures. However, BP ECS but not UBP ECS treatment led to a significant, near 3-fold, increase in cell proliferation (p=0.026) and BDNF levels (p=0.01). In the forced swim test, only BP ECS treated animals had a significantly lower immobility time (p=0.046). There was a trend for similarly reduced hippocampal-dependent memory function in both BP and UBP groups but overall there was not a significant difference between treatment and control animals when tested 10 days after completing allocated treatment. These findings show that, even though both forms of ECS elicited similar motor seizures, UBP ECS was less efficient than BP ECS in inducing antidepressant-related molecular, cellular and behavioural changes.
Item Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
1878-4216

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Donovan, Sineaden_GB
dc.contributor.authorKennedy, Marken_GB
dc.contributor.authorGuinan, Blaithinen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Mara, Shaneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcLoughlin, Declan Men_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-17T08:48:09Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-17T08:48:09Z-
dc.date.issued2012-04-27-
dc.identifier.citationA comparison of brief pulse and ultrabrief pulse electroconvulsive stimulation on rodent brain and behaviour. 2012, 37 (1):147-52 Prog. Neuropsychopharmacol. Biol. Psychiatryen_GB
dc.identifier.issn1878-4216-
dc.identifier.pmid22230649-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.pnpbp.2011.12.012-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/244216-
dc.description.abstractBrief pulse electroconvulsive therapy (BP ECT; pulse width 0.5-1.5ms) is a very effective treatment for severe depression but is associated with cognitive side-effects. It has been proposed that ultrabrief pulse (UBP; pulse width 0.25-0.30ms) ECT may be as effective as BP ECT but have less cognitive effects because it is a more physiological form of neuronal stimulation. To investigate this further, we treated normal rats with a 10 session course of either BP (0.5ms), UBP (0.3ms), or sham electroconvulsive stimulation (ECS) and measured antidepressant-related changes in dentate gyrus cell proliferation and hippocampal BDNF protein levels as well as hippocampal-dependant spatial reference memory using the water plus maze and immobility time on the forced swim test. Both BP and UBP ECS induced very similar types of motor seizures. However, BP ECS but not UBP ECS treatment led to a significant, near 3-fold, increase in cell proliferation (p=0.026) and BDNF levels (p=0.01). In the forced swim test, only BP ECS treated animals had a significantly lower immobility time (p=0.046). There was a trend for similarly reduced hippocampal-dependent memory function in both BP and UBP groups but overall there was not a significant difference between treatment and control animals when tested 10 days after completing allocated treatment. These findings show that, even though both forms of ECS elicited similar motor seizures, UBP ECS was less efficient than BP ECS in inducing antidepressant-related molecular, cellular and behavioural changes.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Progress in neuro-psychopharmacology & biological psychiatryen_GB
dc.titleA comparison of brief pulse and ultrabrief pulse electroconvulsive stimulation on rodent brain and behaviour.en_GB
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTrinity College Institute of Neuroscience, Trinity College Dublin, Dublin 2, Ireland.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalProgress in neuro-psychopharmacology & biological psychiatryen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren

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