Self reporting of symptoms and delays in patients presenting to a rapid access lung cancer clinic (RALCC)

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/244199
Title:
Self reporting of symptoms and delays in patients presenting to a rapid access lung cancer clinic (RALCC)
Authors:
Geraghty, Colm; Uzbeck, Mateen; Dunican, Eleanor
Citation:
JOURNAL OF THORACIC ONCOLOGY: 6 : 6 Supplement: S Pages: S1397-S1398 JUN 2011
Journal:
Journal of Thoracic Oncology
Issue Date:
Jun-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/244199
Abstract:
Introduction: The RALCC at our hospital is aimed at expediting the diagnosis of suspected thoracic malignancies. Methods: A self-reported questionnaire to consecutive patients on their first visit. Patient‘s perception of why they were attending, symptoms, duration before seeking medical attention, time to referral and risks for lung cancer recorded. Results: 154 patients, 81 male, 73 female, mean age 63 years (21-86). GP‘s made most referrals 87% and 68% perceived abnormal radiology as reason for attendance. Majority were symptomatic 88.6% with 57% reporting ≥3 symptoms. Cough was most common presenting symptom 61%, fatigue 52%, dyspnoea 45%, chest infection 45%, chest pain 40%, weight loss 32% and haemoptysis 25%. Haemoptysis had the least delay in presenting to a health care provider (mean 30 days, range 2-120) whereas for cough, dyspnoea and chest pain mean dealy was 4.5 months. Average delay in seeking medical attention and referral to RALLC was 14 weeks. 72% were current or ex-smokers and 21% reported at least one first degree relative with lung cancer. Conclusions: significant delays exist between symptom onset and presentation to a health care provider and depends on symptom type. The bulk of the delay was before patients sought medical attention but there was still a sizeable delay between presentation and referral toRALCC. One in 5 patients had a first degree relative with lung cancer indicating that this may have been a factor in the decision to refer. Our study highlights the need for increased public awareness regarding the presenting symptoms of lung cancer and there exists the opportunity to reduce delays in diagnosis resulting in better outcomes.
Item Type:
Conference Poster
Language:
en
Keywords:
CANCER; THROAT CANCER

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGeraghty, Colmen_GB
dc.contributor.authorUzbeck, Mateenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorDunican, Eleanoren_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-17T08:46:22Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-17T08:46:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-06-
dc.identifier.citationJOURNAL OF THORACIC ONCOLOGY: 6 : 6 Supplement: S Pages: S1397-S1398 JUN 2011en_GB
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/244199-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: The RALCC at our hospital is aimed at expediting the diagnosis of suspected thoracic malignancies. Methods: A self-reported questionnaire to consecutive patients on their first visit. Patient‘s perception of why they were attending, symptoms, duration before seeking medical attention, time to referral and risks for lung cancer recorded. Results: 154 patients, 81 male, 73 female, mean age 63 years (21-86). GP‘s made most referrals 87% and 68% perceived abnormal radiology as reason for attendance. Majority were symptomatic 88.6% with 57% reporting ≥3 symptoms. Cough was most common presenting symptom 61%, fatigue 52%, dyspnoea 45%, chest infection 45%, chest pain 40%, weight loss 32% and haemoptysis 25%. Haemoptysis had the least delay in presenting to a health care provider (mean 30 days, range 2-120) whereas for cough, dyspnoea and chest pain mean dealy was 4.5 months. Average delay in seeking medical attention and referral to RALLC was 14 weeks. 72% were current or ex-smokers and 21% reported at least one first degree relative with lung cancer. Conclusions: significant delays exist between symptom onset and presentation to a health care provider and depends on symptom type. The bulk of the delay was before patients sought medical attention but there was still a sizeable delay between presentation and referral toRALCC. One in 5 patients had a first degree relative with lung cancer indicating that this may have been a factor in the decision to refer. Our study highlights the need for increased public awareness regarding the presenting symptoms of lung cancer and there exists the opportunity to reduce delays in diagnosis resulting in better outcomes.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectCANCERen_GB
dc.subjectTHROAT CANCERen_GB
dc.titleSelf reporting of symptoms and delays in patients presenting to a rapid access lung cancer clinic (RALCC)en_GB
dc.typeConference Posteren
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Thoracic Oncologyen_GB
dc.description.provinceLeinsteren
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