2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/244194
Title:
Consumerism in the health services
Authors:
O'Sullivan, Tim; Health Services Resource Centre
Publisher:
Institute of Public Administration
Issue Date:
Dec-1993
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/244194
Item Type:
Working Paper
Language:
en
Description:
The aim of this paper is to reflect on the model and language of consumerism, which has grown in importance in recent years, particularly in the health services context. Consumerism in a general sense is here to stay in the health services. Efforts to improve quality or responsiveness to the views and needs of health services users can be seen as one of the most encouraging trends of recent times. 'Consumerism' has grown in a context where there seemed to be little comment by service users on the services they were receiving; still less a sense of participation by them in decision-making about their care and treatment. Consumerism in this wider sense has been very closely linked with 'quality', which is partly about improving responsiveness to the needs of individual service recipients. This paper begins therefore (in Section 2) with an overview of quality and consumer-oriented trends in the Irish health services.
Keywords:
CONSUMER; HEALTH SERVICES
Series/Report no.:
6/93

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorO'Sullivan, Timen_GB
dc.contributor.authorHealth Services Resource Centreen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-17T08:38:07Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-17T08:38:07Z-
dc.date.issued1993-12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/244194-
dc.descriptionThe aim of this paper is to reflect on the model and language of consumerism, which has grown in importance in recent years, particularly in the health services context. Consumerism in a general sense is here to stay in the health services. Efforts to improve quality or responsiveness to the views and needs of health services users can be seen as one of the most encouraging trends of recent times. 'Consumerism' has grown in a context where there seemed to be little comment by service users on the services they were receiving; still less a sense of participation by them in decision-making about their care and treatment. Consumerism in this wider sense has been very closely linked with 'quality', which is partly about improving responsiveness to the needs of individual service recipients. This paper begins therefore (in Section 2) with an overview of quality and consumer-oriented trends in the Irish health services.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInstitute of Public Administrationen_GB
dc.relation.ispartofseries6/93en_GB
dc.subjectCONSUMERen_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH SERVICESen_GB
dc.titleConsumerism in the health servicesen_GB
dc.typeWorking Paperen
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