Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/244191
Title:
Criteria for the establishment of Health Centres
Authors:
Cahill, Carmel
Affiliation:
Department of Finance
Publisher:
Government Publications
Issue Date:
Apr-1981
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/244191
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The growth of public health services in Ireland can be traced back to the 19th century. At this time the main development was the introduction of the dispensary system in 1851. Thereby doctors services and drugs were made availab1e to the sick poor. As time progressed the scope of public health services expanded to include areas such as food standards,later supplies, hygiene etc. The early 20th century saw the introduction of maternity and child welfare schemes for the poor and later immunisation against T.B. and diphtheria. Dental, aural and opthalmic services were also introduced and consolidated in this century while the introduction of midiwifery and pub1ic health nursing is a comparative1y recent development. All of these services were supplied from dispensaries, county clinics or clinics specifically provided for the service as in dentistry. Recent Policy Developments Several major factors have been an important influence in community care and health centre development in the last decade. (1) The establishment of a number of regional health boards to replace the health authorities which had hitherto held responsibility for the health services is one major factor. This necessitated a new organisational structure and also involved the necessity to provide accommodation for staff who could no longer be facilitated in local authority offices. (2) The introduction of the choice of doctor scheme which occurred around the same time aimed to remove segregation between public and private patients by giving all patients access to doctors' private surgeries. Theoretically, if not the factor, this rendered the network of dispensary buildings redundant. (3) The publication of the McKinsey report on the organisational and management structures of the new health boards suggested a functional division of work within health boards. Community care areas were to be defined within health boards each led by a team of discipline heads. Sub-areas were to be served by district care teams remaining in close contact with their communities . Although few specific recommendations were made about health centres per se it was implied that health centres strategically located might be needed to facilitate the work of conmunity care teams.
Keywords:
HEALTH POLICY; FINANCE

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCahill, Carmelen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-17T08:29:52Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-17T08:29:52Z-
dc.date.issued1981-04-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/244191-
dc.descriptionThe growth of public health services in Ireland can be traced back to the 19th century. At this time the main development was the introduction of the dispensary system in 1851. Thereby doctors services and drugs were made availab1e to the sick poor. As time progressed the scope of public health services expanded to include areas such as food standards,later supplies, hygiene etc. The early 20th century saw the introduction of maternity and child welfare schemes for the poor and later immunisation against T.B. and diphtheria. Dental, aural and opthalmic services were also introduced and consolidated in this century while the introduction of midiwifery and pub1ic health nursing is a comparative1y recent development. All of these services were supplied from dispensaries, county clinics or clinics specifically provided for the service as in dentistry. Recent Policy Developments Several major factors have been an important influence in community care and health centre development in the last decade. (1) The establishment of a number of regional health boards to replace the health authorities which had hitherto held responsibility for the health services is one major factor. This necessitated a new organisational structure and also involved the necessity to provide accommodation for staff who could no longer be facilitated in local authority offices. (2) The introduction of the choice of doctor scheme which occurred around the same time aimed to remove segregation between public and private patients by giving all patients access to doctors' private surgeries. Theoretically, if not the factor, this rendered the network of dispensary buildings redundant. (3) The publication of the McKinsey report on the organisational and management structures of the new health boards suggested a functional division of work within health boards. Community care areas were to be defined within health boards each led by a team of discipline heads. Sub-areas were to be served by district care teams remaining in close contact with their communities . Although few specific recommendations were made about health centres per se it was implied that health centres strategically located might be needed to facilitate the work of conmunity care teams.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherGovernment Publicationsen_GB
dc.subjectHEALTH POLICYen_GB
dc.subjectFINANCEen_GB
dc.titleCriteria for the establishment of Health Centresen_GB
dc.typeReporten
dc.contributor.departmentDepartment of Financeen_GB
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