Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/243761
Title:
Commission of Inquiry on mental handicap report 1965
Authors:
Commission of Inquiry on Mental Handicap
Publisher:
Stationery Office
Issue Date:
1965
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/243761
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
Mental handicap is one of our gravest problems in the fields of health and education. For many individuals and families it causes considerable strain, frustration. pain and misery which, in turn may lead to stress, maladjustment and mental illness. It results in great loss to the nation through lack of productivity, through underproductivity of the mentally handicapped and through the dependency of the mentally handicapped on others. In probably every country, the amount of money and effort heretofore expended on prevention, care and treatment has been out of proportion to the impact of mental handicap on the individual, the family and the community. Too often it was accepted that little, if anything, could be done, but a marked change in attitude has occurred in recent years. Experience has shown that the potential ability of the mentally handicapped is far greater than was previously believed and that, given suitable care and treatment. particularly when they are young, a large number will be able to lead an independent existence; of the remainder, many will be capable of making a contribution towards their maintenance and the dependency of the vast majority will be greatly reduced. The appreciation of the benefits of care and treatment and the wider awakening of the public conscience have led to a greatly increased interest in the problems presented by mental handicap. In this country, the growing interest manifests itself in the provisions made and planned for increased residential accommodation, in the increased facilities made available for special education. in the public. and state support given to the many voluntary associations which have been fulfilled during the past decade, to help the mentally handicapped and in the establishment of the National Association for the Mentally Handicapped of Ireland. In addition to the services made available by the voluntary bodies, mostly religious orders, which have provided . care for many years there is a steady growth of services for persons living in their own homes. There is a lot of information on the nature and extent of mental handicap and an earnest desire that adequate services should be provided both for those who can live in the community and for those who require some form of residential care. The Commission's main recommendations as to how these services should be provided are as follows:
Keywords:
DISABILITY CARE; DISABILITY MEASURES

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCommission of Inquiry on Mental Handicapen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-13T08:52:36Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-13T08:52:36Z-
dc.date.issued1965-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/243761-
dc.descriptionMental handicap is one of our gravest problems in the fields of health and education. For many individuals and families it causes considerable strain, frustration. pain and misery which, in turn may lead to stress, maladjustment and mental illness. It results in great loss to the nation through lack of productivity, through underproductivity of the mentally handicapped and through the dependency of the mentally handicapped on others. In probably every country, the amount of money and effort heretofore expended on prevention, care and treatment has been out of proportion to the impact of mental handicap on the individual, the family and the community. Too often it was accepted that little, if anything, could be done, but a marked change in attitude has occurred in recent years. Experience has shown that the potential ability of the mentally handicapped is far greater than was previously believed and that, given suitable care and treatment. particularly when they are young, a large number will be able to lead an independent existence; of the remainder, many will be capable of making a contribution towards their maintenance and the dependency of the vast majority will be greatly reduced. The appreciation of the benefits of care and treatment and the wider awakening of the public conscience have led to a greatly increased interest in the problems presented by mental handicap. In this country, the growing interest manifests itself in the provisions made and planned for increased residential accommodation, in the increased facilities made available for special education. in the public. and state support given to the many voluntary associations which have been fulfilled during the past decade, to help the mentally handicapped and in the establishment of the National Association for the Mentally Handicapped of Ireland. In addition to the services made available by the voluntary bodies, mostly religious orders, which have provided . care for many years there is a steady growth of services for persons living in their own homes. There is a lot of information on the nature and extent of mental handicap and an earnest desire that adequate services should be provided both for those who can live in the community and for those who require some form of residential care. The Commission's main recommendations as to how these services should be provided are as follows:en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherStationery Officeen_GB
dc.subjectDISABILITY CAREen_GB
dc.subjectDISABILITY MEASURESen_GB
dc.titleCommission of Inquiry on mental handicap report 1965en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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