Autism: a report of an extensive study of persons with autism in the area covered by the Eastern Health Board: summary of findings

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/243586
Title:
Autism: a report of an extensive study of persons with autism in the area covered by the Eastern Health Board: summary of findings
Authors:
Fitzgerald, Michael; Irish Society for Autism; Eastern Health Board (EHB)
Issue Date:
12-Sep-2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/243586
Item Type:
Study
Language:
en
Description:
The syndrome of autism Over the last two decades our understanding of the nature and origin of autism has expanded greatly. In the sections below, the issues of diagnosis and definition, differential diagnosis, aetiology, and epidemiology of autism are discussed as well as the involvement of families and services in the world of the autistic person. A few points concerning autism should be made at the outset: Firstly, autism is now viewed as a syndrome rather than a disease entity, a condition involving the presentation of a wide range of symptoms (in the domains of cognition, behaviour, communication and social interaction); Secondly, autism is a developmental condition and a prolonged life·long handicap in the mode of mental handicap. Thirdly, autism is not 'curable' by any treatments currently available and leads to a predictable pattern of social, cognitive and emotional dysfunction. Fourthly, autism appears within a period spanning from birth to three years of age. Research does not throw light on the exact point at which autism appears. It is most probable that parents may experience or notice some of the symptoms of autism during the first twelve months of the child's life. The Third Edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Revised Version) (D.S.M.-III-R: The American Psychiatric Association, 1987) in its most recent form define autism according to deficits in three domains. These are the following: A. Reciprocal social interaction. B. Verbal and non·verbal communication, imaginative activity. C. Repertoire of activities and interests. This is the first major study in Ireland concerning autism, previous studies having examined very specific factors associated with the syndrome (e.g. 0' Moore, 1978; McCarthy, Fitzgerald, et al.1984).
Keywords:
AUTISM; DATA ANALYSIS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorFitzgerald, Michaelen_GB
dc.contributor.authorIrish Society for Autismen_GB
dc.contributor.authorEastern Health Board (EHB)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-12T13:53:41Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-12T13:53:41Z-
dc.date.issued2012-09-12-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/243586-
dc.descriptionThe syndrome of autism Over the last two decades our understanding of the nature and origin of autism has expanded greatly. In the sections below, the issues of diagnosis and definition, differential diagnosis, aetiology, and epidemiology of autism are discussed as well as the involvement of families and services in the world of the autistic person. A few points concerning autism should be made at the outset: Firstly, autism is now viewed as a syndrome rather than a disease entity, a condition involving the presentation of a wide range of symptoms (in the domains of cognition, behaviour, communication and social interaction); Secondly, autism is a developmental condition and a prolonged life·long handicap in the mode of mental handicap. Thirdly, autism is not 'curable' by any treatments currently available and leads to a predictable pattern of social, cognitive and emotional dysfunction. Fourthly, autism appears within a period spanning from birth to three years of age. Research does not throw light on the exact point at which autism appears. It is most probable that parents may experience or notice some of the symptoms of autism during the first twelve months of the child's life. The Third Edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (Revised Version) (D.S.M.-III-R: The American Psychiatric Association, 1987) in its most recent form define autism according to deficits in three domains. These are the following: A. Reciprocal social interaction. B. Verbal and non·verbal communication, imaginative activity. C. Repertoire of activities and interests. This is the first major study in Ireland concerning autism, previous studies having examined very specific factors associated with the syndrome (e.g. 0' Moore, 1978; McCarthy, Fitzgerald, et al.1984).en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subjectAUTISMen_GB
dc.subjectDATA ANALYSISen_GB
dc.titleAutism: a report of an extensive study of persons with autism in the area covered by the Eastern Health Board: summary of findingsen_GB
dc.typeStudyen
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