Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/241451
Title:
Medico-Social Research Board annual report 1971
Authors:
Medico-Social Research Board
Publisher:
Medico-Social Research Board
Issue Date:
1971
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/241451
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
In the address given by Mr. Donogh O'Malley, T.D., Minister for Health, on the occasion of the inaugural meeting of the Medico-Social Research Board on the 11th January, 1966, be said: "I regard the establishment of the Medico-Social Research Board as a development of considerable significance to our health services and to the improvement of the health of the people. In the past, the energies of health administrations were concentrated on dealing with serious, clearly defined health problems, particularly in the field of infectious diseases and with making good the major deficiencies in our hospital services. These were obvious problems and their solution was urgent. The need for apparent and urgent action left little time for long-range research. With the dramatic decline in the incidence of infectious diseases and the considerable improvement which has been made in our hospital establishment, however, the character of our problem has changed and there are new priorities. We need to know more about these problems if we are to devise the best solutions for them. It will be the function of the Board, by the application of objective scientific study, to provide the basic information on which sound policy may be developed for the betterment of the health of the community. The great advances achieved by medical science in recent times have, unavoidably, been accompanied by very great increases in the costs of medical treatment and in the capital outlay needed to provide new facilities. In this situation we must do all we can to ensure that future developments are related not only to the situation that actually exists but, as well, take full account of the trends which may produce new situations in a relatively short time." The system providing health services in Ireland lies roughly half way between the system in the United States of America and the British system. It is a mixture of state medicine and private medicine. The lower income group, comprising approximately 30 per cent of the population, is entitled to all medical services free of charge. The middle income group, which comprises approximately a further 55 per cent of the population, is entitled to hospital and specialist services free or at a very small charge. The remainder of the population have to pay for medical treatment but may elect to cover hospitalisation costs by means of a State sponsored insurance scheme. This scheme is run on a commercial but non-profit making basis.
Keywords:
MEDICAL RESEARCH; SOCIAL POLICY

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMedico-Social Research Boarden_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-09-04T19:23:31Z-
dc.date.available2012-09-04T19:23:31Z-
dc.date.issued1971-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/241451-
dc.descriptionIn the address given by Mr. Donogh O'Malley, T.D., Minister for Health, on the occasion of the inaugural meeting of the Medico-Social Research Board on the 11th January, 1966, be said: "I regard the establishment of the Medico-Social Research Board as a development of considerable significance to our health services and to the improvement of the health of the people. In the past, the energies of health administrations were concentrated on dealing with serious, clearly defined health problems, particularly in the field of infectious diseases and with making good the major deficiencies in our hospital services. These were obvious problems and their solution was urgent. The need for apparent and urgent action left little time for long-range research. With the dramatic decline in the incidence of infectious diseases and the considerable improvement which has been made in our hospital establishment, however, the character of our problem has changed and there are new priorities. We need to know more about these problems if we are to devise the best solutions for them. It will be the function of the Board, by the application of objective scientific study, to provide the basic information on which sound policy may be developed for the betterment of the health of the community. The great advances achieved by medical science in recent times have, unavoidably, been accompanied by very great increases in the costs of medical treatment and in the capital outlay needed to provide new facilities. In this situation we must do all we can to ensure that future developments are related not only to the situation that actually exists but, as well, take full account of the trends which may produce new situations in a relatively short time." The system providing health services in Ireland lies roughly half way between the system in the United States of America and the British system. It is a mixture of state medicine and private medicine. The lower income group, comprising approximately 30 per cent of the population, is entitled to all medical services free of charge. The middle income group, which comprises approximately a further 55 per cent of the population, is entitled to hospital and specialist services free or at a very small charge. The remainder of the population have to pay for medical treatment but may elect to cover hospitalisation costs by means of a State sponsored insurance scheme. This scheme is run on a commercial but non-profit making basis.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMedico-Social Research Boarden_GB
dc.subjectMEDICAL RESEARCHen_GB
dc.subjectSOCIAL POLICYen_GB
dc.titleMedico-Social Research Board annual report 1971en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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