Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/240914
Title:
Medical Research Council of Ireland
Authors:
Medical Research Council of Ireland
Publisher:
Medical Research Council of Ireland
Issue Date:
31-Dec-1981
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/240914
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
The Council's commitment, as outlined in the rest of the report, has been in three main areas. Individual research projects are put forward by medical and scientific applicants in the universities and hospitals and are evaluated by expert sub-committees in the fields of cancer, cardiovascular research, gastroenterology, haematology, mental health, metabolism and endocrinology, microbiology, immunology and pathology, pregnancy and congenital deformities. The second main area has been in the support of four research units as already described in our report for 1980. These have covered aspects of alcoholism, brucellosis, coeliac disease and hypertension. Finally, the Council continues to have a large financial commitment to its own Laboratories. While financial constraint has been necessary in all three areas, it is in the first area that the greatest difficulties have been encountered. As the universities and hospitals have expanded both in terms of number of personnel and expertise, the number of first class research proposals that are emerging and being placed before the Council has grown steadily over the years. This has led to the situation where enormous pressure has been put on the Council's meagre resources. Even by drastic restriction in the level of support to any worker by declining to fund most equipment costs and by reducing running costs :;ranted to a bare minimum, it has not been possible to make the available funds meet the minimal requirements. Thus, to an even greater extent than in previous years, the Council has found itself turning down highly recommended grant applications where the considered opinion of the expert sub-committee was that the research should be carried out. The Council sees no possibility of this situation improving until the investment in medical research by the State is improved. Tn this context, it was worth noting that the contribution to medical research either on the basis of population or on gross national product is one of the lowest, if not the lowest, in the EEC. It is obviously difficult in such stringent economic times to make too many demands on hard pressed State resources. However, the Council considers that it has an obligation to ensure that the small amount of money devoted to medical research in this country is increased to bring us nearer to our other partners within the EEC. It is perhaps worth pointing out that within our total grant of £837,000 last year, the Council supported no less than 98 people
Keywords:
MEDICAL RESEARCH; IRELAND

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMedical Research Council of Irelanden_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-31T20:39:24Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-31T20:39:24Z-
dc.date.issued1981-12-31-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/240914-
dc.descriptionThe Council's commitment, as outlined in the rest of the report, has been in three main areas. Individual research projects are put forward by medical and scientific applicants in the universities and hospitals and are evaluated by expert sub-committees in the fields of cancer, cardiovascular research, gastroenterology, haematology, mental health, metabolism and endocrinology, microbiology, immunology and pathology, pregnancy and congenital deformities. The second main area has been in the support of four research units as already described in our report for 1980. These have covered aspects of alcoholism, brucellosis, coeliac disease and hypertension. Finally, the Council continues to have a large financial commitment to its own Laboratories. While financial constraint has been necessary in all three areas, it is in the first area that the greatest difficulties have been encountered. As the universities and hospitals have expanded both in terms of number of personnel and expertise, the number of first class research proposals that are emerging and being placed before the Council has grown steadily over the years. This has led to the situation where enormous pressure has been put on the Council's meagre resources. Even by drastic restriction in the level of support to any worker by declining to fund most equipment costs and by reducing running costs :;ranted to a bare minimum, it has not been possible to make the available funds meet the minimal requirements. Thus, to an even greater extent than in previous years, the Council has found itself turning down highly recommended grant applications where the considered opinion of the expert sub-committee was that the research should be carried out. The Council sees no possibility of this situation improving until the investment in medical research by the State is improved. Tn this context, it was worth noting that the contribution to medical research either on the basis of population or on gross national product is one of the lowest, if not the lowest, in the EEC. It is obviously difficult in such stringent economic times to make too many demands on hard pressed State resources. However, the Council considers that it has an obligation to ensure that the small amount of money devoted to medical research in this country is increased to bring us nearer to our other partners within the EEC. It is perhaps worth pointing out that within our total grant of £837,000 last year, the Council supported no less than 98 peopleen_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMedical Research Council of Irelanden_GB
dc.subjectMEDICAL RESEARCHen_GB
dc.subjectIRELANDen_GB
dc.titleMedical Research Council of Irelanden_GB
dc.typeReporten
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