Medical Research Council of Ireland annual report for the year ended December 31st 1970

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/240912
Title:
Medical Research Council of Ireland annual report for the year ended December 31st 1970
Authors:
Medical Research Council of Ireland
Publisher:
Medical Research Council of Ireland
Issue Date:
31-Jan-1970
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/240912
Item Type:
Report
Language:
en
Description:
It would appear from the above figures that the Council's disbursements during the year exceeded the amount received in grants by £14,000. During the previous year, income exceeded expenditure by £13,000. The balance between income and expenditure has varied in the past, depending sometimes on the receipt of an increase from the Minister too late in the previous year to be utilised in making research swards and sometimes on monies given for the support of research projects not being fully utilised. Taking into account the surplus of last year the financial position at the end of 1970, while causing concern, was not grave. The prospects for 1971, however, are bleak. One of tho main reasons for the deterioration during 1970 was the continuous rise in salaries in all grades of personnel participating in research. This is likely to be considerably aggravated in 1971 by a marked rise in the salaries of junior hospital doctors. While much important fundamental work is done by science graduates it has always been a policy of the Council to encourage medical graduates to undertake research . Doctors must benefit in a very special way from this type of experience and conversely, in tho very nature of things, there are certain contributions towards the understanding of disease which only a medical graduate can make.For a considerable time the salaries which abolished practitioners earn have limited the field from which medically qualified research workers can be recruited till, realistically, we can only expect relatively junior doctors to accept research posts. It will be increasingly difficult to attract oven this grade unless adequate stipends can be offered. In general, doctors, because of their special interest, are prepared to make some sacrifice in order to engage in research, but they cannot be expected to continue to do so if the financial structure of research awards places them at too great a disadvantage.
Keywords:
MEDICAL RESEARCH; IRELAND

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMedical Research Council of Irelanden_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-31T19:55:32Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-31T19:55:32Z-
dc.date.issued1970-01-31-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/240912-
dc.descriptionIt would appear from the above figures that the Council's disbursements during the year exceeded the amount received in grants by £14,000. During the previous year, income exceeded expenditure by £13,000. The balance between income and expenditure has varied in the past, depending sometimes on the receipt of an increase from the Minister too late in the previous year to be utilised in making research swards and sometimes on monies given for the support of research projects not being fully utilised. Taking into account the surplus of last year the financial position at the end of 1970, while causing concern, was not grave. The prospects for 1971, however, are bleak. One of tho main reasons for the deterioration during 1970 was the continuous rise in salaries in all grades of personnel participating in research. This is likely to be considerably aggravated in 1971 by a marked rise in the salaries of junior hospital doctors. While much important fundamental work is done by science graduates it has always been a policy of the Council to encourage medical graduates to undertake research . Doctors must benefit in a very special way from this type of experience and conversely, in tho very nature of things, there are certain contributions towards the understanding of disease which only a medical graduate can make.For a considerable time the salaries which abolished practitioners earn have limited the field from which medically qualified research workers can be recruited till, realistically, we can only expect relatively junior doctors to accept research posts. It will be increasingly difficult to attract oven this grade unless adequate stipends can be offered. In general, doctors, because of their special interest, are prepared to make some sacrifice in order to engage in research, but they cannot be expected to continue to do so if the financial structure of research awards places them at too great a disadvantage.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMedical Research Council of Irelanden_GB
dc.subjectMEDICAL RESEARCHen_GB
dc.subjectIRELANDen_GB
dc.titleMedical Research Council of Ireland annual report for the year ended December 31st 1970en_GB
dc.typeReporten
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