Study of provisions made in Irish hospitals for the special needs of children

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/239952
Title:
Study of provisions made in Irish hospitals for the special needs of children
Authors:
Cleary, Anne; O'Hare, Aileen; Association for the Welfare of Children in Hospital (Ireland); Medico-Social Research Board
Publisher:
Medico-Social Research Board on behalf of the Association for the Welfare of Children in Hospital
Issue Date:
1978
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10147/239952
Item Type:
Study
Language:
en
Description:
With the achievement of to-day's high standard of physical health care in all developed countries attention in the field of paediatrics can now focus on the psychological needs of children in hospital or in any illness context . In the 1950's Dr. John Bowlby spearheaded the articulation of the now familiar and accepted dictated that children should not be unnecessarily separated from their mother. From this has grown a general awareness that children have what Winnicott described as "inherent unalterable needs" that have to be aet if their development is to progress along desirable lines.<2> While recognising the importance of the psychological and psychiatric factors involved in safeguarding the child's well-being when hospitalised, the social context in which the event takes place is also important . A child is part of the family social system and the relationships within the family are tested when he leaves it for the hospital social system with its own norm and expectations, often alien to the family coming into contact with it. For example, we now know that the provision of unrestricted visiting to parents is a very necessary hospital facility for the pre-school child. However hospitals say not provide unrestricted visiting because they consider it unimportant or too bothersome to contemplate. Parents, on the other hand, aay also regard frequent visiting as unnecessary, or may not be able to avail of it, because of the coat involved, because they live too far from the hospital, or have commitments to other family members. The social factors related to the child's hospital stay should be analysed within a sociological framework, because sociology, as a behavioural science, is concerned with describing and examining social relations and the situations in which they occur . The study reported in this paper was carried out by the Medico Social Research Board on behalf of the Association for the Welfare of Children in Hospital (Ireland). Using the sociological approach it was primarily an exploratory descriptive study to establish and coaaent on the provisions available in Irish hospitals for the special needs of children.
Keywords:
CHILDREN; HOSPITALS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCleary, Anneen_GB
dc.contributor.authorO'Hare, Aileenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAssociation for the Welfare of Children in Hospital (Ireland)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMedico-Social Research Boarden_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-08-24T14:44:54Z-
dc.date.available2012-08-24T14:44:54Z-
dc.date.issued1978-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10147/239952-
dc.descriptionWith the achievement of to-day's high standard of physical health care in all developed countries attention in the field of paediatrics can now focus on the psychological needs of children in hospital or in any illness context . In the 1950's Dr. John Bowlby spearheaded the articulation of the now familiar and accepted dictated that children should not be unnecessarily separated from their mother. From this has grown a general awareness that children have what Winnicott described as "inherent unalterable needs" that have to be aet if their development is to progress along desirable lines.<2> While recognising the importance of the psychological and psychiatric factors involved in safeguarding the child's well-being when hospitalised, the social context in which the event takes place is also important . A child is part of the family social system and the relationships within the family are tested when he leaves it for the hospital social system with its own norm and expectations, often alien to the family coming into contact with it. For example, we now know that the provision of unrestricted visiting to parents is a very necessary hospital facility for the pre-school child. However hospitals say not provide unrestricted visiting because they consider it unimportant or too bothersome to contemplate. Parents, on the other hand, aay also regard frequent visiting as unnecessary, or may not be able to avail of it, because of the coat involved, because they live too far from the hospital, or have commitments to other family members. The social factors related to the child's hospital stay should be analysed within a sociological framework, because sociology, as a behavioural science, is concerned with describing and examining social relations and the situations in which they occur . The study reported in this paper was carried out by the Medico Social Research Board on behalf of the Association for the Welfare of Children in Hospital (Ireland). Using the sociological approach it was primarily an exploratory descriptive study to establish and coaaent on the provisions available in Irish hospitals for the special needs of children.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMedico-Social Research Board on behalf of the Association for the Welfare of Children in Hospitalen_GB
dc.subjectCHILDRENen_GB
dc.subjectHOSPITALSen_GB
dc.titleStudy of provisions made in Irish hospitals for the special needs of childrenen_GB
dc.typeStudyen
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